Featured Projects

Kennedy Space Center Central Campus Design NASA

The new seven-story, 200,000-SF Headquarters is a gateway building and Central C...

Kennedy Space Center Central Campus Design NASA

The new seven-story, 200,000-SF Headquarters is a gateway building and Central Campus hub for NASA’s employees at the Kennedy Space Center. This project was led by HuntonBrady as the prime consultant to NASA, with Jones Edmunds as subconsultant throughout all design and construction phases. Jones Edmunds provided site stormwater management system design and permitting, including modifications to the KSC Region 1 Stormwater Permit, utility infrastructure design including water, sanitary sewer, and stormwater utilities and paving and grading of new roadway connections and parking facilities. We provided NASA with follow-on construction administration services for Phase 1 of the new Headquarters building, Kennedy Data Center facility, and associated off-site infrastructure improvements. Jones Edmunds is also providing design services for Phase 2 of the project and has designed a new signalized intersection currently in construction at the main entrance to the Headquarters building off of NASA Parkway.

This project is part of a planned campus theme designed to replace the current Headquarters building and several other support buildings within the Industrial Area. The campus theme was developed during a Master Planning effort in 2010 led by Jones Edmunds with HuntonBrady as the Chief Architect and Planner supporting NASA. The Master Planning effort developed multiple new campus scenarios, each involving transportation, infrastructure, and facilities planning elements, ultimately arriving at the selection of the concept used in the current design and construction phases.

NASA Kennedy Space Center Sand Dunes and Coastal Shoreline Restoration

Hurricane Matthew severely damaged a 3.7-mile stretch of coastline east of Cape ...

NASA Kennedy Space Center Sand Dunes and Coastal Shoreline Restoration

Hurricane Matthew severely damaged a 3.7-mile stretch of coastline east of Cape Road on the NASA KSC that needs to be repaired. Loss and damage of dunes occurred from the north KSC boundary at Eagle 4, just south of Playalinda Beach, to south of Launch Complex 39A at the camera site UCS #12. East of Cape Road, along the beach, are multiple spaceflight camera pads and equipment, weather stations, and an inactive railroad system. West of the road are Launch Complexes 39A and B and high-pressure gas lines, including GN2 and Helium. In one stretch along the beach, the dune system was overwashed during Hurricane Matthew and is now non-existent. The loss of dunes now jeopardizes the weather tracking and camera equipment, Cape Road, access to critical communications infrastructure along the coastline, and the Launch Complexes. Restoration of the damaged dunes and shoreline was imperative to protect critical infrastructure and to allow continued safe use of this roadway. Jones Edmunds provided engineering design services to restore approximately 3.7 miles of KSC beaches and sand dunes on an accelerated schedule. The project encompassed field investigations for wetland delineation, demolition, and permitting with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and provided specifications, drawings, opinion of construction cost, construction schedule, and a data manual. The project will provide protection to KSC’s launch pads, camera and weather stations, and roads from a simulated 25-year storm. The competitive, fixed-price, bid contract encompassed the complete design and construction details for sand dune construction with an estimated 400,000 cubic yards of suitable beach sand, restoration, and vegetative placement along KSC shoreline between KSC’s north boundary (Eagle Nest 4) and the UCS #12 camera pad (south of LC 39A) to stabilize the dunes. The project also included demolition design of an abandoned railroad line along the shore, relocation of a CCAFS weather station, and an extensive investigation and comparison of the feasibility of using off-center sand sources, in addition to investigation, geotechnical testing, and analysis of three potential new sand sources at KSC. The project includes providing engineering services during construction (ESDC) to NASA and limited Title 2 inspection services to observe the sand quality and quantity the amount of material brought to the site and placed on the dunes.

NASA Demolition of Kennedy Space Center Old Headquarters Building and Central Instrumentation Facility

In alignment with NASA’s strategic goal to optimize capabilities and operation...

NASA Demolition of Kennedy Space Center Old Headquarters Building and Central Instrumentation Facility

In alignment with NASA’s strategic goal to optimize capabilities and operations, KSC is in the process of divesting (demolishing) several obsolete and inefficient facilities. This project included the demolition of the old Headquarters Building (~440,000 SF) and Central Instrumentation Facility (~140,000 SF) and to reduce operational and maintenance costs at KSC. The project was also in support of the construction of the new Central Campus Complex.

The demolition task included supporting utility disconnections and alterations, hazardous material testing and coordination with NASA Environmental, and government support. The systems included water, wastewater, stormwater, gas, chill water, hot water, power, communications, and civil infrastructure. The design was coordinated with other improvements in the area to provide a seamless transition as NASA further develops the area into a Central Campus. During the construction phase, Jones Edmunds assisted NASA and provided industry expert support regarding PCB waste and disposal.

Jones Edmunds continues to provide engineering services during construction while the project shifts from the CIF demolition to the HQ Building demolition by reviewing shop drawings, responding to requests for information, attending construction progress meetings, making construction site visits, resolving unforeseen conditions, providing cost opinions, and will prepare as-built/record drawings.

NASA Crawlerway Foundation and Compatibility Study

The Crawlerway at the Kennedy Space Center is a 130-foot wide and over 4.5-mile ...

NASA Crawlerway Foundation and Compatibility Study

The Crawlerway at the Kennedy Space Center is a 130-foot wide and over 4.5-mile long pathway between the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) and the two launch pads at Launch Complex 39. Natural soil and 3 feet of hydraulically dredged soil are below a 5-foot layer of compacted limerock, which lies beneath a 4 to 8 inch surface of Alabama river rocks, which were chosen for many properties, including hardness, roundness, sphericity and resistance to LA Abrasion. The Crawlerway was constructed in the early 1960’s and supported heavy space rockets being rolled to the launch pads throughout the Apollo and Shuttle Programs. Since the end of the Shuttle Program, heavy loads have not been traversing along the Crawlerway for many years and the Crawlerway soil foundation strength has waned and needs refurbishing and strengthening to support NASA’s next space program. By 2013, a project to repair and upgrade the Crawlerway was undertaken. It was the first time the foundation had been repaired since it was constructed. The limerock layer was increased by 2 inches, and the degraded river rock was removed and replaced with new river rock.

The Crawlerway was originally designed to support the weight of the Saturn V rocket and its payload, plus the Launch Umbilical Tower and Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), atop a Crawler Transporter (CT) during the Apollo Program. The total load to the ground was over 17 million pounds. The Crawlerway was also used from 1981 to 2011 to transport the Space Shuttles, also atop the MLP and CT, with a total load of 18 million pounds.

Jones Edmunds provided a study to evaluate the Crawlerway foundation for the transition from the Shuttle Program to NASA’s new heavy-lift vehicle, SLS. The Shuttle weighed 18 million pounds, and NASA’s new heavy-lift vehicle is expected to weigh over 26 million pounds.

The goals of this project included determining if the foundation could handle the increased load and performing a full-scale load test using a CT shoe to find the most suitable surface to use with the new heavy-lift vehicle.

We coordinated with several NASA organizations and their subconsultants to mobilize the load test apparatus, including Ames Research Center, Florida Department of Transportation, USACE ERDC, United Space Alliance, and EG&G. The load test required 500,000 pounds of weight vertically loaded onto the existing CT track shoe. A 250-ton “water bottle”, which NASA uses at the VAB to certify cranes, was used as ballast for the horizontal load. The load test included evaluating various gravel materials and resilient mats, while pressure cells were used to better understand distribution of the load under the CT shoe.

This project was awarded the 2011 Florida Section Project of the Year by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Civil Design

Our civil design projects give us the opportunity to put our creativity to the test by identifying challenges and creating solutions for developing and effectively delivering quality and innovative designs and permitting, cognizant of time and budget constraints. Our vast knowledge of civil engineering systems helps create smart designs with a focus on functionality, ease of maintenance, and future growth. We help our government, aerospace, industrial, and federal clients with the services listed below:

  • Civil Infrastructure Systems
  • Stormwater Management Facilities
  • Transportation Systems
  • Coastal Resiliency
  • Facilities Design and Construction
  • Deconstruction / Hazardous Material Abatement

Learn More About Spaceport Infrastructure

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