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NASA Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility

Jones Edmunds provided engineering/architectural study, design, and construction...

NASA Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility

Jones Edmunds provided engineering/architectural study, design, and construction-phase services for a new Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The new facility is LEED Platinum certified and consists of a two-story 9,500-SF administration facility and a one-story 1,800-SF maintenance facility. Propellants North received the 2012 FICE Engineering Excellence Grand Award and the 2012 ACEC Engineering Excellence Honor Award.

City of West Palm Beach Stormwater Master Plan

Jones Edmunds was part of a team selected by the City of West Palm Beach to deve...

City of West Palm Beach Stormwater Master Plan

Jones Edmunds was part of a team selected by the City of West Palm Beach to develop a clear, comprehensive, and forward-looking framework that encompasses the City’s existing stormwater management program. This project included services to investigate key components of stormwater as it relates to the City of West Palm Beach. We established goals and a foundation for future policy decisions, and developed a final product that will help the City guide its stormwater management program for the next 30 years.

Polk County North Central Landfill Bioreactor

Jones Edmunds designed and obtained permitting for modifications to the Leachate...

Polk County North Central Landfill Bioreactor

Jones Edmunds designed and obtained permitting for modifications to the Leachate Management System at the North Central Landfill, including the design of the landfill’s bioreactor system. Jones Edmunds teamed with the University of Florida to design and permit a bioreactor. This will help the County save over $1 million a year on leachate treatment and disposal costs. The County transported all of the leachate from its three facilities to Jacksonville, Lakeland, or Miami for treatment. The goal of the bioreactor is 100% leachate recirculation of the leachate from all three facilities with the only cost of leachate hauling/treatment to be the cost of hauling the leachate from the Southeast or Northeast Landfills to the North Central Landfill. Since operation began, approximately 19 million gallons of leachate have been recirculated. The project specifically includes designing the bioreactor system of pumps, force mains, recirculation hydrants, and headers and a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) system for operating and retrieving data from the system. Not only does the SCADA system allow the County staff to see how the pumping and delivery systems are functioning from the office, but it also allows the operator to change the pumping regime from the office and produces the FDEP-required reports. Jones Edmunds provided the following bidding and construction-phase services on the project:
  • Resident observation
  • Shop drawing review
  • Pay request review
  • Processing of change orders
  • Processing of requests for additional information
  • Conducting construction meetings
  • Reviewing submittals
  • Preparing FDEP-required monthly progress reports
  • Certifying construction-completion reports
  • Providing startup and training services after construction

NASA New Access Roadway (Galaxy Way and Space Commerce Way Intersection)

Jones Edmunds supported Delaware North Companies with design and construction professional services for widening Space Commerce Way, a new signalized intersection, and a new multi-lane access roadway north from the new intersection into the Visitor Complex south Parking Lot 7, where a new parking plaza was constructed to handle visitor parking. The traffic signal design includes a specialized hinged mast arm to allow for rotation of the mast arms to provide clearance for large payloads transported from commercial aerospace facilities along Space Commerce Way. Jones Edmunds played a key role in compiling requirements for hardware transport and implementing solutions.

The project included a NEPA-compliant Environmental Assessment and Traffic Study. The design included signalization, roadway construction, parking area improvements, stormwater management systems, wetland mitigation, and site lighting. Jones Edmunds facilitated FPL’s involvement in providing power supply, incorporated their design standards into the project, and coordinated easement development.

Jones Edmunds’ experience, understanding, and prioritization of NASA’s institutional processes and key stakeholders helped ensure compliance and proper approval from authorities involved. Jones Edmunds spearheaded stakeholder involvement for collaboration, problem-solving, and ongoing status updates. Stakeholders included NASA Environmental, Engineering, Master Planning, Fire, Surveying, Traffic, Blue Origin, FPL, Space Florida, St. Johns River Water Management District, and US Army Corps of Engineers. Jones Edmunds provided construction administration, engineering, and inspection support to Delaware North through construction completion. This included compliance with permit agency requirements, certifications, and record documents. Jones Edmunds is now providing ongoing wetland monitoring as required by the USACE permit.

Polk County North Central Landfill Phase V Design, Permitting, and Construction Services

This 30-acre landfill expansion consisted of a 27-acre double composite liner sy...

Polk County North Central Landfill Phase V Design, Permitting, and Construction Services

This 30-acre landfill expansion consisted of a 27-acre double composite liner system and a 3- acre singled-lined vertical expansion over portions of the existing on-site Class III landfill. The design included a number of innovative elements to increase current and future capacity. This design also helped reduce the construction and operational costs of the facility. We constructed portions of the Phase V bottom liner below the seasonal high water level, resulting in a significant reduction in backfill material requirements and the generation of more than 200,000 cubic yards of soil for landfill operations. The design also included a unique leachate collection system liner flap and pump stations ready for future expansion to the east of the Phase V facility.

Sarasota County Water/Wastewater Hydraulic Models

To help develop a Wastewater Management Plan (WWMP), Sarasota County requested J...

Sarasota County Water/Wastewater Hydraulic Models

To help develop a Wastewater Management Plan (WWMP), Sarasota County requested Jones Edmunds develop hydraulic models of its conventional lift station and force main systems using SewerCAD™ and use the models to evaluate proposed wastewater system improvements necessary to maintain the existing system and support future growth. The County currently owns and operates complex and extensive wastewater collection/transmission systems comprised of around 83,700 sewer connections, over 700 conventional lift stations (LSs) with 300 miles of force mains, over 1,000 miles of gravity sewer mains, several alternative wastewater collection systems, and 4 WWTFs. At the time the models were initially developed, the County owned 10 WWTFs. Later, some of these WWTFs were decommissioned. As part of the model development effort, Jones Edmunds developed 10 dynamic hydraulic wastewater models from the County’s July 2007 wastewater system geodatabase (GDB). The models include approximately 550 County-owned lift stations and associated force mains. Gravity sewer mains, which connect cascading conventional lift stations and force main systems; and gravity sewer interceptors, which connect conventional lift station and force main systems to WWTFs are included in the models. The model network layout is primarily based on the wastewater GDB developed as part of the County’s Geographic Information System (GIS) Mapping project. Portions of the County’s wastewater GDB were updated by Jones Edmunds’ GIS Department before it was used as a basis for the model GDB. In addition, the County provided additional LS information including LS type (triplex, duplex, etc.), wet well dimensions, force main and gravity main diameters and routing, and elevations. Jones Edmunds spatially rectified numerous record drawing documents including scanned as-builts and digitized facility data to achieve a final wastewater GDB suitable for developing a wastewater model. While developing the models, Jones Edmunds worked with the County operations staff to confirm the size and configuration of system components as much as possible. The lift station systems for which supervisory control and data acquisition data (SCADA) were available were calibrated to field conditions to the extent practical. Model calibration included adjusting model parameters (e.g., lift station inflow hydrographs, level controls, force main Hazen-Williams coefficients) to match model lift station run times and WWTP influent flow to actual values. Subsequently, we identified system deficiencies and proposed system improvements to overcome significant deficiencies, allow for growth, and to optimize use of existing pumping facilities. The models were set up to assist the County, with planning and identifying potential deficiencies within the system. With a well calibrated dynamic model completed, we next developed an intuitive method to review deficiencies and benefits of improvement alternatives. Due to the extent of the manifolded lift station/force-main systems within critical portions of the County’s wastewater systems, several LSs periodically experience reduced capacities or deadhead conditions during high-flow periods. For large systems such as this, upgrading the system to eliminate all potential deadhead conditions, as determined through steady-state modeling, is rarely an economically viable solution. By developing a detailed model that reasonably represents the physical components and performance of the actual system and that contains all LS pumps and controls, it is possible through extended period simulation (EPS) to force the model to sequence pumps on/off as done in an actual system. By developing these detailed models and loading 24-hour diurnal flow patterns for given flow days, it is possible utilize a more realistic approach to assess system deficiencies that are expected to occur. System deficiencies were assessed using EPS of various flow conditions. Using innovate techniques we were able to provide the County a map that indicates which lift stations experienced a deadhead condition, the number of deadhead events experienced, and the duration of each deadhead condition. In addition we showed the maximum depth reached in a given wetwell after its high-water alarm was activated. The presentation of this information in an intuitive color-coded map facilitates decision-making. Upgrades can be quickly inserted in the model, simulations re-run, and new maps compared to existing condition maps to validate decisions and compare impacts of improvements on reducing deficiencies.

Brevard County Lamplighter Area Drainage Study and Improvements

After Tropical Storm Fay flooded Lamplighter Village, Brevard County took immediate action to lessen the chance of future flooding. Jones Edmunds conducted a study to determine ways to lower the flood stage in the Lamplighter area, part of the M-1 Canal/Crane Creek Watershed in unincorporated Brevard County. Crane Creek discharges to the Indian River Lagoon, but there are interconnections under I-95 to the St. Johns River. The study evaluated alternatives to divert more flow to the St. Johns River, which would also restore some historical flow patterns. Jones Edmunds then provided engineering services to the Brevard County Natural Resources Management Office as part of the County’s Watershed Management Program for culvert improvements under I-95 at Lamplighter Village in unincorporated Brevard County. The project involved fast-track design and permitting of approximately 200 linear feet of culvert (6-foot-by-6-foot box culvert equivalent) under I-95 to parallel an existing 6-foot-by-6-foot box culvert. The County plans to contract with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and their contractor-who is currently working to widen I-95 in the area of the proposed culvert crossing-for construction. Our services on this project included designing the culvert improvement, preparing drawings and technical specifications, preparing an emergency request to the St. Johns River Water Management District to install the culvert before permitting, preparing a permit application package for FDOT, and providing technical assistance during the contracting and construction phases.

NASA Schwartz Road Landfill Closure

Jones Edmunds prepared construction drawings, specifications, and engineering re...

NASA Schwartz Road Landfill Closure

Jones Edmunds prepared construction drawings, specifications, and engineering reports necessary to close the 64-acre Schwartz Road Landfill. This landfill had operated since the late 1960s and received a combination of demolition debris and municipal solid waste from activities at Kennedy Space Center.

City of Plant City Reclaimed Water Main Sanitary Sewage Force Main and Potable Water Main Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided the detailed design, prepared contract documents, obtaine...

City of Plant City Reclaimed Water Main Sanitary Sewage Force Main and Potable Water Main Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided the detailed design, prepared contract documents, obtained permitting, and provided limited construction-phase services for installing a Reclaimed Water Transmission Main (RCWM) and a Sanitary Sewage Force Main from the City’s wastewater treatment plant on Victoria Street to Cherry Street. The project involved preparing construction plans and specifications for two large-diameter parallel pipelines, along with roadway improvements, selected potable water main replacements, and future RCWM connection stub-outs. Specifically, the RCWM provided a source of reclaimed water from an existing RCW high-service pump station discharge pipe at the treatment plant to Wilder Road. Jones Edmunds’ services included:
  • 16,600 feet of 24-inch reclaimed water main
  • 12,600 feet of 20-inch sewage force main
  • 2,000 feet of 12-inch potable water main
  • FDOT permitting
  • Roadway reconstruction of over 4,000 feet of Cherry Street
  • CSX railroad permitting
  • Stakeholder communication and involvement
The job included furnishing and installing the new pipe, valves, fittings, connections, and crossings; excavating, backfilling, and compacting; testing; re-paving; and disposal and restoration in accordance with the project plans and City of Plant City specifications. The pipelines were installed along rights-of-way and in most locations required restoring the entire roadway to the original grade and dimensions. In some areas minor roadway and drainage flow improvements were accomplished as part of revised restoration activities. Jones Edmunds was also responsible for project permits, including a crossing of active CSX railroad lines and required permits, including SWFWMD, Hillsborough County Health Department, and FDEP. We also coordinated with and installed pipeline in conjunction with an ongoing FDOT roadway-widening project, requiring FDOT permitting. The route of the pipelines mainly traversed residential and commercial areas, which required close communication with the public. Pipeline tie-ins required close coordination with Hillsborough County Community College at one terminus and the City of Plant City’s wastewater treatment plant at the origin of the project.

East Putnam County Regional Water System

Jones Edmunds provided all planning, design, and permitting for a new regional water system in east Putnam County. The project included a 1.0-MGD reverse osmosis water treatment plant treatment facility expandable to 4.0 MGD, a 250,000-gallon ground storage tank, a 6.0-MGD high-service pump station, and a 100,000-gallon elevated storage tank. Approximately 27 miles of transmission and distribution piping ranging from 6 inches to 24 inches in diameter, approximately 820 services and 125 fire hydrants were also part of the project. Jones Edmunds worked closely with the County on developing a funding package that included more than $14.7 million dollars in grant funds and $14 million in low interest loans from five different agencies including the USDA Rural Development, state legislature, the SJRWMD through an Alternative Water Supply grant, FDEP SRF, and EPA. There was also extensive communication and public outreach required as Jones Edmunds supported the County with negotiations with the Florida Department of Corrections, held one-on-one meetings with elected officials at the local and state levels, and held public meetings to address concerns of area residents and business owners. This project received the 2010 APWA Project of the Year Award.

Charlotte County East Port Water Reclamation Facility Expansion

Jones Edmunds prepared a preliminary engineering report and provided final desig...

Charlotte County East Port Water Reclamation Facility Expansion

Jones Edmunds prepared a preliminary engineering report and provided final design and construction administration services for a phased expansion of the 6-MGD East Port WRF to 9 MGD. Jones Edmunds provided the following services:
  • Capacity assessment of existing unit processes
  • Treatment and hydraulic evaluations required for 9-MGD Annual Average Daily Flow and 27-MGD peak hourly flow
  • Energy conservation evaluation to reduce power and O&M costs
  • Recommended phased expansion program to provide improvements and capacity as needed and meet available funding
Jones Edmunds also helped the County procure grant funding (50% matching funds) from the Southwest Florida Water Management District for the reclaimed water plant improvements.

Putnam County East Putnam Regional Water System (EPRWS)

Jones Edmunds provided all planning, design, and permitting for a new regional water system. Eight permits were secured for this project. The water treatment plant (WTP) is a 1.0-MGD reverse osmosis treatment facility expandable to 4.0 MGD. The water supply is from groundwater wells, and the treatment process includes cartridge filtration, reverse-osmosis membrane filtration, degasification towers, and odor-control facilities. Chemicals being stored and used in the treatment process include scale inhibitor, sodium hypochlorite, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, and fluoride. A 250,000-gallon ground storage tank, a 6.0-MGD high-service pump station, and a 100,000-gallon elevated storage tank were constructed as part of the project. The concentrate water from the reverse osmosis WTP is reintroduced in to the St. Johns River via an underwater diffuser system.Jones Edmunds also designed and provided construction administration for approximately 27 miles of transmission and distribution piping ranging in size from 6 inches to 24 inches in diameter. The service meters range in size from _ inch to 4 inches in diameter. Approximately 820 services and 125 fire hydrants were constructed.The funding package associated with this project included a grant/loan from U.S. Department of Agriculture – Rural Development, state legislative appropriations, an Alternative Water Supply grant from St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD), a Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) State Revolving Fund loan, and a US Environmental Protection Agency grant. Jones Edmunds provided comprehensive construction-phase services for this project, which included coordinating the execution of the Owner-Contractor contract and delivery to the contracting parties and the funding agencies. Jones Edmunds also worked with the Contractor during the construction phase to observe that the project was constructed in accordance with the intent of the contract documents. Jones Edmunds staff reviewed and tracked shop drawings, responded to requests for information, held weekly and monthly site meetings, observed the work, prepared daily progress reports, responded to the Contractor’s written correspondence, processed monthly pay requests, coordinated with funding agencies, negotiated change orders, and performed other duties as required to ensure a successful construction project. In addition, Jones Edmunds assessed petroleum contamination discovered during excavation of a stormwater pond at the Putnam County Public Works Facility. We determined that the contamination was the result of improper handling of materials and wastes at an asphalt plant formerly located at the site. Contaminants at the site were a commingled plume of diesel fuel and asphalt. Jones Edmunds staff used a variety of techniques, including direct-push sampling methods, to rapidly characterize the extent of the contamination. We then planned dewatering, treatment of the extracted water, and excavation of the contaminated source materials). We provided construction-observation services during the excavation of more than 6,000 cubic yards of soil that were disposed of in the County landfill. Negotiations with SJRWMD and FDEP were required to modify the Environmental Resource Permit and Consumptive Use Permit for the facility under construction. We coordinated closely with the agencies throughout the assessment and remediation process to minimize disruption to the construction schedule.

NASA Kennedy Space Center Sand Dunes and Coastal Shoreline Restoration

Hurricane Matthew severely damaged a 3.7-mile stretch of coastline east of Cape Road on the NASA KSC that needs to be repaired. Loss and damage of dunes occurred from the north KSC boundary at Eagle 4, just south of Playalinda Beach, to south of Launch Complex 39A at the camera site UCS #12. East of Cape Road, along the beach, are multiple spaceflight camera pads and equipment, weather stations, and an inactive railroad system. West of the road are Launch Complexes 39A and B and high-pressure gas lines, including GN2 and Helium. In one stretch along the beach, the dune system was overwashed during Hurricane Matthew and is now non-existent. The loss of dunes now jeopardizes the weather tracking and camera equipment, Cape Road, access to critical communications infrastructure along the coastline, and the Launch Complexes. Restoration of the damaged dunes and shoreline was imperative to protect critical infrastructure and to allow continued safe use of this roadway. Jones Edmunds provided engineering design services to restore approximately 3.7 miles of KSC beaches and sand dunes on an accelerated schedule. The project encompassed field investigations for wetland delineation, demolition, and permitting with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and provided specifications, drawings, opinion of construction cost, construction schedule, and a data manual. The project will provide protection to KSC’s launch pads, camera and weather stations, and roads from a simulated 25-year storm. The competitive, fixed-price, bid contract encompassed the complete design and construction details for sand dune construction with an estimated 400,000 cubic yards of suitable beach sand, restoration, and vegetative placement along KSC shoreline between KSC’s north boundary (Eagle Nest 4) and the UCS #12 camera pad (south of LC 39A) to stabilize the dunes. The project also included demolition design of an abandoned railroad line along the shore, relocation of a CCAFS weather station, and an extensive investigation and comparison of the feasibility of using off-center sand sources, in addition to investigation, geotechnical testing, and analysis of three potential new sand sources at KSC. The project includes providing engineering services during construction (ESDC) to NASA and limited Title 2 inspection services to observe the sand quality and quantity the amount of material brought to the site and placed on the dunes.

Sarasota County Coastal Fringe Watershed Management Plan

Jones Edmunds developed a Watershed Management Plan (WMP) for the Coastal Fringe...

Sarasota County Coastal Fringe Watershed Management Plan

Jones Edmunds developed a Watershed Management Plan (WMP) for the Coastal Fringe Roberts Bay (North) Watershed. The project generally followed SWFWMD’s Guidelines and Specifications for Developing Watershed Management Plans, with the four major elements being Project Development, Digital Topographic Information, Watershed Evaluation, and Watershed Management Plan. The watershed is approximately 5 square miles and includes the coastal regions east of the Phillippi Creek and Matheny Creek watersheds. Most of the development occurred before modern stormwater management regulations, so only a small percentage is served by current Best Management Practices (BMPs). Approximately three-fourths of the watershed is below the 100-year storm surge. With the exception of Grand Canal, which is primarily for watercraft navigation, there are very few larger stormwater management systems in the watershed. Much of the watershed is characterized by local-scale drainage features that discharge directly to the Gulf of Mexico or the Bay. Therefore, the level of detail in the model and the determination of what should be represented in the watershed modeled differed from other Sarasota County and SWFWMD WMPs. Digital topographic information was primarily based on 2007 LiDAR data from the Florida Division of Emergency Management Coastal LiDAR project, which Jones Edmunds helped to manage. Due to existing level of urbanization, virtually no topographic voids due to development are newer than the LiDAR flight. However, the density of multi-story buildings in some portions of the watershed does leave a questionable bare-earth representation of the terrain. The watershed evaluation was expedited using the County’s Stormwater Infrastructure Database. This database, although not complete, allowed for a detailed understanding of the local storm sewer networks and their impact on basin delineations. Additionally, they provided a more thorough understanding of the stormwater system at the initial desktop level than what is often available, which helped focus the amount of field reconnaissance needed.

City of Bartow Electrical Distribution System Inventory

Jones Edmunds inventoried all electrical distribution system assets within the C...

City of Bartow Electrical Distribution System Inventory

Jones Edmunds inventoried all electrical distribution system assets within the City of Bartow. We worked with the City to develop a custom electrical system geodatabase. Furthermore, we populated it with a complete field inventory of Bartow’s existing electrical distribution system. This included migrating data from numerous existing CAD drawings as well as field locating over 10,000 electrical assets using sub-meter GPS technology. Jones Edmunds collected numerous database attributes for each asset along with digital photographs. Deliverables included an electrical geodatabase suitable for various GIS functions including tracing and outage management.

Charlotte County Potable Water Distribution Model Update WO #07

Jones Edmunds was selected by Charlotte County Utilities (CCU) to update, expand...

Charlotte County Potable Water Distribution Model Update WO #07

Jones Edmunds was selected by Charlotte County Utilities (CCU) to update, expand, and calibrate the water distribution model. Charlotte County needed to expand its drinking water distribution service in a logical and orderly manner. To meet this objective, CCU wanted to use the updated and calibrated model to plan future improvements. The update/calibration effort improved the predictive capabilities of the model, increased confidence in the model results, and increased the model’s usefulness as a planning and design tool. Jones Edmunds calibrated the updated water distribution system model using field data of pressures and flows in the water distribution system and developed and oversaw a field test plan that was executed by CCU staff. Field data were made available to Jones Edmunds before the model calibration, and we hydraulically analyzed and evaluated existing and future system conditions and water age. We identified existing system deficiencies and made recommendations for system improvements.

Braden River Utilities Reclaimed Water Interconnect

Jones Edmunds provided preliminary engineering, final design, contract document preparation, and bidding- and construction-phase services for the Braden River Utilities (BRU) Reclaimed Water Interconnect Project. The $13-million project brings reclaimed water to Lakewood Ranch, a residential development, from the City of Bradenton and solves the irrigation issues that the development has had since its inception 20 years ago. It also reduces the City’s discharge to the Manatee River.

The project consisted of reclaimed water transmission and distribution lines, pumping facilities, and a storage facility to interconnect with the City of Bradenton reclaimed water system and expand BRU’s irrigation storage transmission system. Jones Edmunds prepared the plans, specifications, and permit applications in five separate bidding packages, including hydraulic modeling of the reclaimed water transmission system.

The total length of the project consisted of approximately 49,000 feet of 20-inch transmission main and 4,900 feet of 16-inch and 4,600 feet of 12-inch distribution mains. The project also included a new pump station capable of delivering a minimum of 1,400 gpm (2 MGD) and a maximum of 4,200 gpm (6 MGD) at the City’s 2-million-gallon ground storage tank at the River Run Golf Course. Approximately 5,000 feet of existing 16-inch ductile iron and PVC pipe crossing the Braden River were reused. Due to the heavily congested route, the pipeline required many horizontal directional drills, including a 2,400-foot drill under I-75.

As a multi-jurisdictional, private-public partnership, this project was co-funded by BRU and the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), and the City of Bradenton provided assets, including the River Run Pump Station and a 4,200-foot section of existing 16-inch diameter transmission pipe.

In 2014, this project was named the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) SunCoast Branch Project of the Year.

City of Newberry Wastewater Facilities Plan

Jones Edmunds prepared a Facility Plan for the City’s proposed water recla...

City of Newberry Wastewater Facilities Plan

Jones Edmunds prepared a Facility Plan for the City’s proposed water reclamation facility expansion in accordance with FAC 62-503. This supports the State Revolving Fund Program and will serve as the Preliminary Engineering Report for future FDEP permitting services. The Facilities Plan provides descriptions, preliminary design information, and proposed locations for multiple treatment components that comprise the WRF. This includes preliminary and secondary treatment, disinfection, land application, residuals treatment, flow measurement, sampling and recording, and internal pumping stations. Furthermore, Jones Edmunds will provide the preliminary site layout, prepare an opinion of probable construction costs for location options, and prepare a schedule for final design and construction. We presented a summary of our findings and the Facilities Plan to the City Commission and detailed our recommended wastewater treatment plan. In addition, we prepared and submitted a revised Request for Inclusion to FDEP to enable the City to obtain a new preconstruction loan. We also submitted an application for a construction loan to cover construction capital costs and engineering construction services.

Pinellas County North County Phase 2B Reclaimed Water Distribution System

Jones Edmunds conducted the routing study, prepared the detailed design, and obt...

Pinellas County North County Phase 2B Reclaimed Water Distribution System

Jones Edmunds conducted the routing study, prepared the detailed design, and obtained permitting for 135,000 feet of transmission and distribution mains ranging from 4-inch to 16-inch diameters. Notably, the transmission and distribution mains provide reclaimed water service to over 2,200 properties, including 6,400 feet of 16-inch-diameter transmission main installed by open cut and horizontal directional drilling. The design was prepared in accordance with Pinellas County Utilities standards. Jones Edmunds prepared the plans, specifications, and permit applications in three separate bidding parts, including hydraulic modeling of the total Phase 2B and adjacent systems. In addition, coordinating with other consulting engineers (under separate contract with the County) was required on adjacent tie-in locations. Furthermore, Jones Edmunds participated in public meetings with local concerned citizens. We also performed limited construction-phase services, including reviewing shop drawings and assisting the County as needed during construction and system start-up. Jones Edmunds’ services included:
  • Design of a 6.400 feet of 16-inch diameter transmission main installed by open cut and horizontal directional drilling
  • Design of 135,000 feet of transmission and distribution mains ranging from 4-inch to 16-inch diameters
  • Coordinating with FDOT for crossings and right-of-way
  • Utility locates/pipe routing
  • Ensuring maintenance of traffic
  • Obtaining permitting
  • Interfacing with consultants
  • Designing adjacent phases
This project required coordination with multiple consultants chosen by the County on tie-in locations. Specifically, this required designing to alleviate unacceptable pressures remaining from other portions of the project.

Sarasota County Water and Wastewater Data Migration

Jones Edmunds updated the Sarasota County Wastewater GIS network by performing a...

Sarasota County Water and Wastewater Data Migration

Jones Edmunds updated the Sarasota County Wastewater GIS network by performing a comprehensive review of existing GIS data against scanned and rectified as-built documents, which included 208 record sets consisting of 1,484 sheets. Utility assets mapped during this effort include:
  • 3,700+ water meters
  • 500+ fire hydrants
  • 90 miles of water distribution and transmission lines
  • 375+ manholes
  • 35+ lift stations and vacuum pumps
  • 18+ miles of force main and vacuum sewer lines
  • 587+ reclaimed water meters
  • 24+ miles of reclaimed water lines
Our efforts also included migrating the underlying wastewater data from as-built documents (scanned TIFFs) into the County’s existing geodatabase. In addition, we spatially adjusting the scanned as-builts provided by the County and digitizing relevant utility data into the geodatabase.

Putnam County Regional Wastewater System Services During Construction

Putnam County hired Jones Edmunds to complete all planning, design, and permitti...

Putnam County Regional Wastewater System Services During Construction

Putnam County hired Jones Edmunds to complete all planning, design, and permitting for the new wastewater system in East Putnam County. Design and construction included a new wastewater treatment plant, six new lift stations, and all associated force main installations and grinder pump installs. The East Putnam County Regional Wastewater System included 32 commercial connections and 234 residential connections as well as the Putnam Correctional Institution (PCI), which gets PCI out of the utilities business and allows greater focus on its primary mission, and the County-owned Public Works Facility. The new facilities include more than 6 miles of piping, a .300-MGD ring steel treatment facility, and rapid infiltration basins (RIBs) with a disposal capacity of .240 MGD. The total project cost was approximately $14 million. All connections to the new wastewater system removed a septic system or package plant all of which were within 1 mile of the St. Johns River, helping to lower the pollutant load from septic system’s effluent that has been impacting the River.

Wakulla County Lower Bridge Class III Closure Construction Phase

Jones Edmunds assisted Wakulla County with design, permitting, and performing co...

Wakulla County Lower Bridge Class III Closure Construction Phase

Jones Edmunds assisted Wakulla County with design, permitting, and performing construction phase services for the Lower Bridge Class III Landfill closure. The 5-acre Class III landfill closure design was developed to meet site-specific requirement and includes a clay barrier layer and protective cover. The work included excavation of waste located outside the permitted limits of the landfill and a large amount of re-grading and shaping of the landfill to lessen steep side slope. The design also included stormwater conveyance and gas vents. The design was developed to minimize closure costs. Due to the relative remoteness of the site the materials of construction had to be carefully considered to make sure that they were locally available to avoid excessive costs. The clay barrier layer was selected in part so that local resources and contractors could be used to perform the work. A local contractor was awarded the project, which helps sustain the local economy. Construction-phase services included bid phase coordination, construction administration, resident observation, CQA of all liner materials, and FDEP CQA Report preparation.

City of Gainesville Duval Regional Stormwater Park

Jones Edmunds provided permitting, design, and construction contract documents f...

City of Gainesville Duval Regional Stormwater Park

Jones Edmunds provided permitting, design, and construction contract documents for the Duval Regional Stormwater Park. This stormwater retrofit project addresses the Newnan’s Lake nutrient TMDL and serves multiple purposes for a Florida Front Porch Community grant. The project provides water quality treatment for approximately 70 acres of existing urban development. The primary treatment component is a 2-acre wet detention pond. A Suntree nutrient separating baffle box pretreats the inflow to the wet detention pond. Treated discharge from the pond rehydrates a downstream wetland impacted by nearby ditching. The 26-acre project area also includes a nature trail and a parking area. Urban development in the vicinity of this project has redirected the surface water around the site through the existing storm sewer and ditching network. The project includes constructing an interceptor pipe that connects the nearby storm sewer on NE 8th Avenue to the site. We designed the constructed pond to resemble a natural lake as closely as possible by having shorelines with gently curving forms and varying basin slopes. Native species already on site or that enhance the diversity of existing wetlands populate the littoral zone. The stormwater pond was located to avoid wetlands and minimize the loss of significant trees. In addition, we designed a 2700-foot ADA-compliant nature path with boardwalks spanning existing wetlands and paved sections in uplands. The path traverses the park property through upland forest, over wetlands, and along the wet detention pond. The project received $500,000 of 319(h) grant funding. Jones Edmunds developed pollutant loading reduction calculations for pre- and post-project conditions with a focus on total phosphorus, which is the pollutant of concern for the Newnan’s Lake. Specifically, a portion of the load reduction can help with redevelopment projects in the watershed. To help administer the load reduction credits, we developed an easy-to-use spreadsheet model that calculates new loads from redevelopment in a manner consistent with the original calculations. This premiere stormwater design is commonly referenced in the Florida stormwater community. All in all, it demonstrates Jones Edmunds’ ability to combine practical stormwater treatment design elements with multi-use park facilities. This project also received a high level of public support and utilization by the local residents.

Pinellas County Cross Bayou Watershed Management Plan

Jones Edmunds developed a Watershed Management Plan (WMP) for the Cross Bayou Wa...

Pinellas County Cross Bayou Watershed Management Plan

Jones Edmunds developed a Watershed Management Plan (WMP) for the Cross Bayou Watershed. The project consisted of selected elements from SWFWMD’s Watershed Management Plan Guidelines & Specifications. Primary tasks included creation of digital topographic information, development of a watershed evaluation report, identification of surveys to be performed and preliminary junction/reach coverage development, model simulations, BMP analysis, floodplain mapping and a surface water resource assessment. The watershed is approximately 13 square miles and connects across to both coasts of the Pinellas County peninsula. We used existing stormwater asset inventory data from the County, the City of Seminole, and the City of Largo – all in different formats – to reduce field reconnaissance and survey requirements and to better define local drainage patterns. The floodplain model was developed in ICPR and had to consider significant inflows from two canals outside of the watershed as well as other intermittent connections with surrounding watersheds. Development of the model schematic and model parameterization were expedited through extensive use of GIS-model automation tools and our standard operating procedures for applying the tools. The tools made extensive use of LiDAR data and other site plan information that superseded the LiDAR data in specific locations to develop a date-certain terrain, soils and land use layers, stormwater infrastructure geodatabases, and high-resolution multispectral imagery. The model was calibrated and verified at two USGS gage locations as well as at other high water mark locations throughout the watershed for a recent very large storm event. NEXRAD data were used for the verification, and local rain gage data were used to corroborate the NEXRAD data.

SWFWMD Flatford Swamp Feasibility Analysis

Flatford Swamp is a forested wetland in east Manatee County that has received excess water during the dry season due to nearby agricultural practices. This has resulted in significant tree mortality and encroachment of several invasive herbaceous and shrub species. The goal of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of using recharge wells to restore the hydrologic period and at the same time use the water to recharge the Most Impacted Area (MIA) of the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA). Jones Edmunds, with ASRus as a subconsultant, completed a conceptual design of a surface water recharge project. The project evaluated the feasibility of using recharge wells to restore the hydrologic period and use the water to recharge the MIA of the UFA. The Jones Edmunds and ASRus team evaluated recharging potential flows of 30 MGD. As part of the project, the team obtained a construction and testing permit for an Exploratory Class V, Group 2 Exploratory Aquifer Recharge well through FDEP’s UIC Department. The proposed target recharge zone is the Avon Park High Permeability Zone, which is expected to be within the Underground Source of Drinking Water. The permit includes a Zone of Discharge condition to allow the injected water to equilibrate to concentrations below the drinking water standards before leaving the site.

NASA 21st Century Horizontal Launch and Landing Area Development Plan

Jones Edmunds provided planning and engineering services to develop a horizontal...

NASA 21st Century Horizontal Launch and Landing Area Development Plan

Jones Edmunds provided planning and engineering services to develop a horizontal launch and landing area development plan for the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The study included recommendations for future spaceport infrastructure to re-purpose the facility into a commercial launch site and a 20-year capital improvement and growth forecast to transform the facility.

NASA Demolition of FSS/RSS Launch Complex 39B

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services for a preliminary engineering report (PER) that investigated options for the design, demolition, and modification of Launch Pad 39B to support the new Constellation Program. Items investigated included concrete surface paving and repair of slopes due to the launch environment, underground catacomb concrete repair, large-diameter pipe demolition, electrical service feeders, LOX/LH2 cross-country pipeline supports, repair of perimeter grating and trenching, structural modifications to steel access platforms, and an assessment of sedimentation in flumes and holding ponds. Each element was analyzed to determine the extent of repairs required and to evaluate repair options. Projects were then prioritized based on the risk of failure, the implementation schedule with respect to Constellation operations, and the relative cost of the remedial action. After completing the PER, Jones Edmunds performed study and design-phase engineering services to define requirements associated with the demolition of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) and the Fixed Service Structure (FSS) at Launch Complex Pad 39B to prepare for the conversion from the Shuttle Launch Program to the NASA Constellation Program. Study elements included demolition sequencing, several alternative RSS and FSS demolition options, cost estimates associated with each option, demolition schedules, security and export control restrictions, historic preservation, salvage, and recycling opportunities. The design contract documents consisted of two sets of drawings and specifications – 1) Safing and Disconnect of Systems, and 2) Demolition of the RSS and FSS. The design addressed low- and medium-voltage power, instrumentation and controls, fire alarm, communications, mechanical fluids and gases, hypergolic and cryogenic systems, hazardous materials evaluation, environmental controls and policy, International Traffic and Arms Regulations, opinion of probable costs, programs and future work coordination, structural as-built investigation, and structural repair and refurbishment. Jones Edmunds also provided technical services during the construction phase of demolition of the FSS and RSS at the Launch Complex Pad 39B. We received, reviewed, and recommended action for construction contract submittals, requests for information (RFIs), and deviations/waivers. We provided engineering expertise and design for all corrective actions and we analyzed test results and procedures. We performed technical reviews of all shop drawings and related documentation to certify that they complied with construction drawings and specifications. We coordinated closely with the NASA system engineer to facilitate communication.  Responsiveness was a key factor of this project — shop drawings were reviewed and processed expeditiously to meet NASA’s timeline. We prepared Engineering Orders (EOs) as needed to correct and/or clarify shop drawings, including the accompanying cost estimates. Following the completion of the construction phase, we certified that environmental components were completed in accordance with the approved permits. Throughout the construction phase, Jones Edmunds provided construction site visits and participated in status meetings as needed to clarify, explain, and/or recommend direction and resolve issues with design drawings. We provided technical assistance and participated in system acceptance tests and final inspections to meet Certificate of Completion requirements and verify that construction met the design intent.

FDEP Highland Hammock State Park

Jones Edmunds provided civil engineering design services and construction-phase ...

FDEP Highland Hammock State Park

Jones Edmunds provided civil engineering design services and construction-phase technical support related to paving improvements, campground improvements, building additions, and ADA access at Highlands Hammock State Park for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). Our design services included collecting information on existing conditions, designing the improvements and meeting with permitting agencies. We also prepared permit applications, cost opinions for the improvements, and final drawings and technical specifications for FDEP’s use in bidding and construction. We designed and constructed project improvements in two phases. Phase 1 included improvements at three areas:
  • Scenic Bike Path – Adding a 4-foot-wide paved bicycle lane adjacent to the one-way 3-mile-long scenic loop to allow visitors to access the park’s 9 trails. The bike path loop encompasses the park’s storied hardwood hammock forest. Bicyclists can now enjoy the ride along a dedicated bike lane, better-protected from vehicles that share the scenic loop.
  • Camping Area – Paving loop roads and adding ADA access to a restroom and a bathhouse. We also added the parking area in front of the Recreation Center to address drainage issues at the access to the building.
  • Picnic Area – Adding building additions including a restroom facility and two pavilions that can be accessed via concrete sidewalks. These structures include historical architectural elements of adjacent structures at the park.
Phase 2 included improvements at the following sites:
  • Equestrian Camping Area – Adding six to eight camp sites, a horse pasture area, a paddock, tether areas, bathhouse building, and on-site utilities.
  • 7-Lakes Day Use Area – Adding a new restroom building with a front porch and a small park ranger office, two pavilions accessible by concrete sidewalks, and paved handicap parking.

Charlotte County Enterprise GIS Implementation/GIS Spatial Assessment

Jones Edmunds developed a comprehensive geodatabase of Charlotte County Utilities’ (CCU) water, reclaimed water, and wastewater networks. The effort involved geodatabase design and data migration (from AutoCAD and several non-spatial data sources) as well as utility-wide field data collection. The resulting work products also serve as a cornerstone for the County’s asset and work order management system, DataStream. The following steps were required to develop and deploy the CCU water/wastewater (W/WW) geodatabase:
  • Project Initiation and Data Research
  • Geodatabase Design and Development
  • Including conducting Geodatabase Workshops with CCU
  • Migration Plan and Protocol
  • Data Migration
  • Field Data Collection (Sub-Foot GPS) – 19,000 Points
  • Horizontal Adjustment
  • Application Development Feasibility Analysis
  • Including developing a CAD Data-Migration Tool
  • Final Geodatabase Spatial Refinement
  • Including developing a fully connected geometric network
  • Geodatabase Implementation
  • Develop Standard Operating Procedures (Office and Field)
  • Provide Training
Jones Edmunds deployed an Enterprise Geodatabase and provided CCU with the tools and training to further maintain and develop their W/WW data. The developed Standard Operating Procedures provided CCU with a detailed and repeatable approach to continue field data collection efforts along with desktop data integration and editing of Geographic Information System data. The W/WW geodatabase has been integrated with the DataStream product to allow work orders to be issued against W/WW facilities in the geodatabase, resulting in an Enterprise solution for Charlotte County Utilities.

City of Clearwater Alligator Creek Channel F Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided preliminary and final design plus permitting and construc...

City of Clearwater Alligator Creek Channel F Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided preliminary and final design plus permitting and construction-observation services for stabilizing an eroding stream channel (Channel F) in the City of Clearwater’s Alligator Creek and bringing the channel’s alignment back into the City’s drainage easement. The City undertook the project in response to long-time complaints from residents about the situation. Jones Edmunds’ specific activities included hydrologic and hydraulic analysis, stormwater design, permitting, and construction services including holding kickoff and final meetings with citizens and other stakeholders, coordinating utilities, obtaining permitting, and overseeing bid services. During the project Jones Edmunds worked with residents to minimize damage to private property during construction and realignment. Since access for heavy equipment was difficult, work took place in the channel itself. Part of the project site intersected the City-County boundary, so we coordinated the two jurisdictions. Other difficult aspects of the project included the need to adjust on site the gabion design of residential roof drains that drained into the channel to accommodate local drainage and to save many large protected trees that had grown along the channel. Although we typically do not recommend channel hardening except as a last resort, this project demonstrates our ability to implement different types of recommended watershed improvements in highly urbanized areas. That knowledge can be applied to future projects to develop designs and cost alternatives that are permittable and constructible.

City of Leesburg Lee Street Pond and Canal Street Pond Drainage Improvements

Jones Edmunds designed, permitted, and monitored two stormwater management facil...

City of Leesburg Lee Street Pond and Canal Street Pond Drainage Improvements

Jones Edmunds designed, permitted, and monitored two stormwater management facilities to address flooding and water quality concerns in the Whispering Pines Basin in Leesburg. Jones Edmunds began by conducting a project development and evaluation study for the City. The two highest-ranked projects from the study – the Canal Street Pond and the Lee Street Pond – were then designed and constructed to help meet TMDL pollutant-load-reduction goals and address a flooding problem area. The first project is the Canal Street pond, which consists of a 2-acre wet detention pond on City-owned property along with several reaches of storm sewer to direct flows to the pond. The pond provides retrofit treatment of a portion of the downtown area and was also sized to accommodate redevelopment and densification in the downtown area. The Lee Street stormwater treatment facility consists of a 2-acre wet detention pond followed by a 2-acre treatment wetland. The treatment wetland takes advantage of onsite wetlands that were in need of restoration. The wet detention pond/treatment wetland system should maximize phosphorus removal-the pollutant of concern in the TMDL-while maximizing the benefit to existing onsite wetlands. Jones Edmunds designed a diversion structure and bypass channel to prevent excessively high flows from entering the pond and re-suspending settled pollutants. Both treatment facilities were designed to be natural looking by curving the edges and varying the side slopes. Jones Edmunds also incorporated other park features into the Lee Street site and developed public education kiosks for both sites. Jones Edmunds helped the City obtain grant funding from the Lake County Water Authority and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s TMDL grant-funding program. The grants covered most of the project costs. Jones Edmunds also provided post-construction monitoring of the Lee Street pond as part of the grant-funding requirements. Monitoring results demonstrated a phosphorus removal efficiency of approximately 85%. This project demonstrates our ability to combine practical design solutions while still providing cost-effective ways to address water quality. It also is a good example of how stormwater design can blend into communities and improve the quality of life.

FDEP Sebastian Inlet State Park New Concession Building

Jones Edmunds designed, obtained permitting, and provided construction services ...

FDEP Sebastian Inlet State Park New Concession Building

Jones Edmunds designed, obtained permitting, and provided construction services to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) for a new 5,000-SF two-story concession and gift shop building at the Sebastian Inlet State Park. The design included civil, environmental, mechanical, electrical, and structural elements, as well as coordinating on the architectural components of the project. This project also involved demolishing the existing 1,600-SF concession building and associated deck areas. The new structure includes a food concession area to accommodate approximately 50 people, as well as a gift shop, a rental space for special events, and a covered open-air deck. The facility provides boardwalk and deck areas with views overlooking Sebastian Inlet and the Atlantic Ocean. Special design considerations included permitting seaward of the Coastal Construction Control Line and lighting that minimizes the effect on sea turtle habitat.

Brevard County West Melbourne Stormwater Quality Retrofit

Jones Edmunds is providing professional design services for water quality improv...

Brevard County West Melbourne Stormwater Quality Retrofit

Jones Edmunds is providing professional design services for water quality improvements to previously developed storm drainage systems in West Melbourne, Florida. The scope includes retrofitting 10 sites to install proposed nutrient separating baffle boxes. The project is receiving funding through the 319 Grant Program and is for the west part of West Melbourne. The Brevard County Stormwater Utility Department is managing the project based on the Department’s interlocal agreement.

City of Bradenton Eastside Wastewater Transmission System Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided preliminary design, field data collection, final design, ...

City of Bradenton Eastside Wastewater Transmission System Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided preliminary design, field data collection, final design, permitting, bidding, and construction administration services for the design of large-diameter wastewater transmission force mains and improvements to two lift stations serving the east side of the City of Bradenton and their associated force mains and gravity interceptors. These improvements were intended to replace aging facilities, provide flow relief to existing facilities, and provide increased wastewater transmission for the east side of the City. These improvements also included design and construction of expansions to two main lift stations in the system. Jones Edmunds coordinated the extensive permitting efforts required for the project that included:
  • USACE ERP and Sovereign Submerged Land Easement
  • CSX Pipeline Crossing Permit
  • FDEP Construction of Domestic WW Collection/Transmission System
  • FDOT Utility Location Permits

Walton County Transfer Station

Walton County’s existing transfer station needed to be replaced because it was not ideally designed for this purpose and was nearing the end of its useful life. In addition, the existing facility was not well located on the County’s solid waste management site with respect to future solid waste management needs of the County.

Jones Edmunds worked closely with County staff to develop a Concept Plan for a new solid waste transfer station in concert with the County’s longer term goals and objectives for solid waste management. To provide more efficient management of solid waste by the County, Jones Edmunds developed recommendations for a more effective transfer station design and optimum location for the facility on the County’s solid waste management site. We prepared a detailed report that assessed the sizing needs for the new facility, evaluated three site location options and associated costs, and provided schematic drawings of the proposed site plans and the proposed building plan and elevations. Based on regulatory requirements, good engineering design, and input from County staff, Jones Edmunds incorporated the proposed design elements for the facilities including vehicle access and routing, operational needs such as breakroom and bathroom facilities, leachate collection and management, truck scale requirements, provision for electric power, access roadway and inbound scale facility, site paving and grading, building design to accommodate future expansion of the facility, stormwater management, provision for fire protection, extra trailer parking, and communication capabilities to other site facilities. The Concept Plan was presented to the County and draft format for review and comment. Upon discussion of County comments, the Concept Plan was finalized and approved by the County.

Following completion of the site Concept Plan, Jones Edmunds developed preliminary design documents for the civil site work and building architectural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and structural design for the Solid Waste Transfer Station Facility. The structural, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing design elements were prepared by subconsultant McVeigh and Mangum, and the architectural design was prepared by subconsultant WMB-ROI. Jones Edmunds also coordinated the preparation of site survey and geotechnical investigations through subconsultants for the project. Jones Edmunds worked with local City utilities providers to assess and provide for water and sewer service requirements for the facility. The work products consisted of construction drawings and technical specifications to the level necessary to prepare FDEP permit application packages consisting of Solid Waste Processing Facility Permit Application and Environmental Resources Permit Application for submittal to FDEP. Jones Edmunds coordinated reapplication meetings for both permits and coordinated with County staff. Both FDEP permits were received with minimal comments from the reviewers. We also prepared the FDEP water and sewer service connection permits, coordinating these applications and final design details with the City.

Upon confirmation of approved permit applications, Jones Edmunds developed Construction Bid Documents that include complete design drawings and specifications for Bidding and Construction. We worked with County procurement staff to develop the final bid documents for use in the bidding process.

City of Tavares Lake Frances Sewer Improvements

The Lake Frances Estates subdivision was developed in the 1970s. The sewer syste...

City of Tavares Lake Frances Sewer Improvements

The Lake Frances Estates subdivision was developed in the 1970s. The sewer system was installed in a substandard manner compared to today’s construction standards. Issues of concern included sanitary sewer overflows from lift stations and manholes and in the collection system itself. This has led to sanitary sewer overflows. Gravity pipes were laid at substandard grades and with substandard cover, with some pipes having as little as 18 inches of cover. The City recognized these issues and hired Jones Edmunds to perform a two-phase design to add an additional lift station, replace a majority of the sewer system, specify a CIPP liner for existing mains with proper slope, design and specify specific point repairs, and connect the replaced sewer systems into the existing lift stations including relining these lift stations. Upon completion, all roadways within the neighborhood will be milled and overlaid to provide a new, visually appealing asphalt surface. We developed a Preliminary Design Recommendations (PDR) for the Lake Frances Estates subdivision. This included gravity sewers, lift stations, manholes, and force mains. The PDR included surveying all gravity sewer manholes throughout the system to confirm pipe configurations, sizes, rim elevations, and inverts. Obtaining this data was necessary to determine pipe flow directions and pipe slopes and to determine where additional flow from outside the neighborhood was being introduced via existing force mains. We also reviewed City videotapes of the sewer system to evaluate the conditions of manholes, sewer mains, and services. The total Lake Frances Estates project includes the design of one new lift station, improvements to two existing lift stations and 65 manholes, and improvements to 18,164 linear feet of 8-inch and 10-inch-diameter gravity sewer main. Water mains and storm sewers within the areas of sewer replacement will also be upgraded or replaced during construction. Coordination with residents was critical during the PDR and design phases and will be equally as important during construction. Many of the gravity lines are in backyard easements and hard-to-access areas, so coordination with homeowners was essential. Additionally, the homeowners association had to be involved with decisions. Finally, we also coordinated with FDOT because the gravity sewers have to go through their property that contains a stormwater pond.

NASA Fire Station No. 2 Study, Design and Construction

Jones Edmunds provided architectural and engineering design services for a new 2...

NASA Fire Station No. 2 Study, Design and Construction

Jones Edmunds provided architectural and engineering design services for a new 21,000-SF fire station with six drive-through bays, individual sleeping quarters for 16 people, and an administrative area.

NASA Mid-Course Radar Facility, Phases II and III Info

Jones Edmunds provided architectural and engineering design and construction-pha...

NASA Mid-Course Radar Facility, Phases II and III Info

Jones Edmunds provided architectural and engineering design and construction-phase services for the Mid-Course Radar Facility, a one-of-a-kind 50-foot-diameter, C-Band Radar Facility at Kennedy Space Center. This is the largest radar of its type and frequency in the world.

NASA Launch Complex 39B Structure Demolition

Jones Edmunds provided engineering study, design, and construction-phase service...

NASA Launch Complex 39B Structure Demolition

Jones Edmunds provided engineering study, design, and construction-phase services for the demolition of the Rotating Service Structure and the Fixed Service Structure at Launch Complex Pad 39B, which included extensive preparation to disconnect multiple systems. The facility was demolished to prepare the launch pad to be converted from the Shuttle Launch Program to the NASA Constellation and other future programs.

City of Clearwater Marshall Street WRF Influent Pump Station Headworks Replacement

Jones Edmunds and team are providing pre-design, design services, final design, permitting, and bidding phase services for improvements to the Marshall Street Water Reclamation Facility (WRF). This work includes replacement of the IPS and the headworks structure and associated odor control systems, an influent flow equalization (EQ) tank , electrical, instrumentation and control improvements, and collaborating with Duke Energy to upgrade the electrical / transformer loop between the new IPS, Reclaimed Water High Service Pump Station, and Laboratory transformers. The design will incorporate constructability in a phased approach that minimizes impacts to the operations of the WRF during construction and startup to maintain compliance with the WRF’s FDEP Operating Permit.

Polk County Imperial Lakes WTP Improvements

The existing Imperial Lakes Water Treatment Plant (WTP) consists of two wells, a...

Polk County Imperial Lakes WTP Improvements

The existing Imperial Lakes Water Treatment Plant (WTP) consists of two wells, a 0.25-million-gallon (MG) pre-stressed concrete ground storage tank (GST), a high-service pumping station (HSPS), two hydropneumatic tanks, a sodium hypochlorite chemical storage and feed system, and a caustic chemical storage and feed system. Finished water is pumped from the WTP into the water distribution system through two 12-inch-diameter water mains. Based on data plate information, Well Pumps 1 and 2 have a combined capacity of 3,000 gallons per minute (gpm). The GST is fitted with a tray aerator for hydrogen sulfide removal. Unfortunately, hydrogen sulfide gas given off by aeration has deteriorated the concrete in the underside of the dome, causing exposure and subsequent corrosion of the rebar. A previous structural assessment of the GST concluded that the GST should be demolished. Based on data plate information, the HSPS consists of four pumps with unequal capacities. The firm capacity of the HSPS is 2,250 gpm. Jones Edmunds prepared the preliminary design report and final design improvements to the Imperial Lakes Water Treatment Plant. The final design improvements included:
  • Construct a third well and well pump.
  • Demolish the existing GST and construct a new 1-MG GST.
  • Construct a hydrogen sulfide removal system.
  • Expand the high-service pumping capability with a new high-service pump station.
  • Expand the sodium hypochlorite disinfection system.
  • Provide an emergency generator.

Destin Water Users, Inc. Cityworks Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Implementation

Keeping the utility’s infrastructure in top working order has always been a high priority for Destin Water Users, Inc. (DWU). Developing and implementing Cityworks as their AMS has helped them do just that. DWU is a member-owned utility cooperative that serves all of incorporated Destin and portions of unincorporated Okaloosa County. DWU handles the operations of all water, wastewater, and reclaimed water infrastructure for up to 45,000 people. They operate a 6.2-MGD water treatment plant, a 6.0-MGD wastewater treatment plant, 79 lift stations, 678 fire hydrants, and over 2,000 water valves. DWU identified a need for an AMS and asked Jones Edmunds to establish and implement this AMS using Cityworks Server. Jones Edmunds performed a phased implementation of Cityworks consisting of three installments. Phase I focused on Lift Stations and Warehouse (Inventory); Phase II focused on the Safety Group, Finance Group, and Field Operations; and Phase III focused on Plant Operations and the Laboratory Group. Jones Edmunds also developed a web-based purchase order application that communicated directly with Cityworks Storeroom and SQL Reporting Services. From enhanced communications and response times to better transparency and accountability, Cityworks is helping improve DWU’s ability to manage their assets and resources. For example, DWU staff are using Cityworks to track their backflow prevention inspections, capturing a potential multi-step pass or fail inspection process and all the associated pertinent information. The knowledge they are accumulating through their AMS helps DWU make more informed decisions on how to manage their assets.

NASA Crawlerway Foundation and Compatibility Study

The Crawlerway at the Kennedy Space Center is a 130-foot wide and over 4.5-mile long pathway between the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) and the two launch pads at Launch Complex 39. Natural soil and 3 feet of hydraulically dredged soil are below a 5-foot layer of compacted limerock, which lies beneath a 4 to 8 inch surface of Alabama river rocks, which were chosen for many properties, including hardness, roundness, sphericity and resistance to LA Abrasion. The Crawlerway was constructed in the early 1960’s and supported heavy space rockets being rolled to the launch pads throughout the Apollo and Shuttle Programs. Since the end of the Shuttle Program, heavy loads have not been traversing along the Crawlerway for many years and the Crawlerway soil foundation strength has waned and needs refurbishing and strengthening to support NASA’s next space program. By 2013, a project to repair and upgrade the Crawlerway was undertaken. It was the first time the foundation had been repaired since it was constructed. The limerock layer was increased by 2 inches, and the degraded river rock was removed and replaced with new river rock.

The Crawlerway was originally designed to support the weight of the Saturn V rocket and its payload, plus the Launch Umbilical Tower and Mobile Launch Platform (MLP), atop a Crawler Transporter (CT) during the Apollo Program. The total load to the ground was over 17 million pounds. The Crawlerway was also used from 1981 to 2011 to transport the Space Shuttles, also atop the MLP and CT, with a total load of 18 million pounds.

Jones Edmunds provided a study to evaluate the Crawlerway foundation for the transition from the Shuttle Program to NASA’s new heavy-lift vehicle, SLS. The Shuttle weighed 18 million pounds, and NASA’s new heavy-lift vehicle is expected to weigh over 26 million pounds.

The goals of this project included determining if the foundation could handle the increased load and performing a full-scale load test using a CT shoe to find the most suitable surface to use with the new heavy-lift vehicle.

We coordinated with several NASA organizations and their subconsultants to mobilize the load test apparatus, including Ames Research Center, Florida Department of Transportation, USACE ERDC, United Space Alliance, and EG&G. The load test required 500,000 pounds of weight vertically loaded onto the existing CT track shoe. A 250-ton “water bottle”, which NASA uses at the VAB to certify cranes, was used as ballast for the horizontal load. The load test included evaluating various gravel materials and resilient mats, while pressure cells were used to better understand distribution of the load under the CT shoe.

This project was awarded the 2011 Florida Section Project of the Year by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

City of Bradenton Reservoir Expansion

Jones Edmunds designed the expansion of the City’s 1.4-billion-gallon rese...

City of Bradenton Reservoir Expansion

Jones Edmunds designed the expansion of the City’s 1.4-billion-gallon reservoir in the mid 1980s and an 8-MGD surface water treatment plant in the early 1990s. This project allowed the City to deliver stable finished water during seasonal variations in surface water supply quality. The surface-water treatment plant unit processes include:
  • Powered-activated carbon (PAC)
  • Chemical addition systems (pH adjustment with sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, ferric sulfate coagulation)
  • Rapid mixing
  • Flocculation
  • Settling
  • Filtration with dual-media filters,
  • Disinfection
  • 1 MG of clearwell capacity
  • A supplemental 14-inch potable groundwater well
  • An operations building,
  • An electrical instrumentation and control systems
  • A high-service pumping facilities with 4 MG of ground storag
In 2006, Jones Edmunds prepared a Water Treatment Plant Rerating Report and Permit Application to increase the permitted capacity of the City’s water treatment plant. As a result, the capacity increased from the existing 8.0-MGD to a proposed 12.0-MGD. The Rerating Report was prepared in accordance with the requirements contained in Chapter 62-555.528 FAC. The new operating permit for the increased 4 MGD of capacity was obtained with only minor modifications required to the facility. The estimated cost for the rerated plant capacity of 12 MGD was $600,000. Most of the upgrade work for new chemical feeders and storage tanks to be completed by the City public works staff. In 2009, Jones Edmunds designed a new disinfection tank for the plant’s water service to meet CT requirements at the increased plant capacity. Jones Edmunds completed the Phase 1 preliminary engineering report and then provided engineering services for the Phase 2 design of the Bradenton Reservoir Expansion. This project is being executed in accordance with a Southwest Florida Water Management District funding agreement. This project involves the design and construction of an upland off-stream storage facility adjacent to the City of Bradenton’s water supply reservoir. This facility will capture excess flow from the Braden River during the wet season’s high flow periods. Analysis of the City’s current water supply capacity provided by the existing reservoir, augmentation well, plus recently constructed potable water ASR well and projection of the City’s needs through 2025 show that an additional 2.15 MGD of raw water supply and storage to carry the City through drought periods will be needed. The estimated cost for the new storage facilities is $15,750,000.

NASA Scour Protection at Kennedy Space Center Bridges

Jones Edmunds provided engineering study, design, and construction-phase service...

NASA Scour Protection at Kennedy Space Center Bridges

Jones Edmunds provided engineering study, design, and construction-phase services to install scour protection at the Indian River bridges and Banana River bridge along SR 405, the Jay Jay Railroad Bridge, and the SR-3 Bridge over the Haulover Canal at Kennedy Space Center. The project included in-depth field investigations and hydraulic and scour analyses at all bridges.

St. Johns County San Sebastian Study

Jones Edmunds assisted St. Johns County with evaluating and developing a coastal resiliency vulnerability assessment for infrastructure and structures within the San Sebastian drainage basin. The assessment assisted the County in both assessing risk and in developing drainage improvements. The project consisted of four primary tasks. The first task identified potential future flooding risks based on the following inputs: 2017 NOAA sea level rise (SLR) projections to characterize coastal flooding risks. Regional stormwater models (West Augustine and/or North Augustine Regional Models) previously developed for the County by Jones Edmunds. We updated the models to characterize potential future inland flooding risks. Our updates reflected changes in boundary conditions and soil storage due to SLR. Using a regional ADCIRC Model to characterize surge levels and wind speeds occurring at typical planning frequencies (i.e., the 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year storms). The second task used the results from the first task to identify impacted infrastructure and structures. The third task identified adaptation strategies for five priority infrastructure projects. The strategies included options and conceptual approaches for adaptation along with a time horizon for implementation. The final task provided guidance for future infrastructure planning in areas of increased SLR risk.

Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority Cityworks Server Implementation and Enterprise GIS Services

Jones Edmunds was selected to support the Florida Keys Aqueduct Authority (FKAA) for a multi-phase Cityworks implementation. The first phase was a utility-wide review of business processes related to GIS and work and asset management, which included discovery meetings with 10 different departments including IT, Finance, Customer Service, and their entire operations group including lift stations, wastewater collection, water distribution, fleet, and water production. FKAA has many disparate systems including their finance and customer service software (Cogsdale), Esri GIS, CCTV, and SCADA. One of the primary outcomes of the review was the need for a Cityworks integration with their Cogsdale to reconcile fixed assets, customers and meter related work orders. Phase 2, a Cityworks implementation for their linear water system, fleet, and customer service, included the Cogsdale integration. Phase 2 also included implementation of an Enterprise GIS that included GIS database re-design, deployment, and configuration to cloud servers on Azure to ensure high availability, including ArcGIS Server and Web Adaptor. Phase 3 includes an implementation of Cityworks for their wastewater and water vertical assets, technical services, engineering, and backflow prevention with integrations with SCADA and Neptune.

SFWMD Lakeside STA Gopher Tortoise Relocation

Jones Edmunds conducted gopher tortoise survey, permitting, and relocation services for the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) Lakeside Ranch Stormwater Treatment Area project that comprises over 1,200 acres. Jones Edmunds also completed extensive vegetation and tortoise surveys for the SFWMD Hickory Hammock and Ft. Basinger recipient sites. We prepared and submitted two separate gopher tortoise relocation (Conservation) and a Long-Term Recipient Site permit application to the FWC and obtained permits. The Ft. Basinger site is SFWMD’s first gopher tortoise recipient site. Burrowing owls, bald eagles, and Sherman’s fox squirrels were also documented on-site by Jones Edmunds scientists. Jones Edmunds conducted several pre-construction 100% tortoise surveys of the site, assisted with and supervised the backhoe excavation of over 300 burrows, and transported and released over 150 tortoises to the SFWMD Hickory Hammock or the Brahma Island Recipient Site. We generated a Final Report which summarized the surveys, permitting, and relocation activities at this site.

FDEP Kenwood Boat Ramp Access Road, Parking Area, and Ramp Improvements

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) needed to improve road...

FDEP Kenwood Boat Ramp Access Road, Parking Area, and Ramp Improvements

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) needed to improve road access to the Kenwood Boat Ramp in Putnam County. To accomplish this goal, Jones Edmunds prepared new design work, roadway construction plans, and supporting calculations for the following improvements:
  • 1,400 feet of existing dirt roadway improvements, ramp access, and parking areas
  • 3,200 feet of improved roadway access
  • Turn-lane improvements, including a northbound off-ramp and a southbound left-turn lane
Jones Edmunds developed roadway plan and profile sheets, earthwork cross sections, and signing and pavement marking plans for this project. We also supported with related stormwater issues and permitting for this site.

St. Johns County Deep Creek Regional Stormwater Treatment Facility

St. Johns County receives nutrient-removal credits as part of the Lower St. John...

St. Johns County Deep Creek Regional Stormwater Treatment Facility

St. Johns County receives nutrient-removal credits as part of the Lower St. Johns River (LSJR) Basin Management Action Plan (BMAP) for the long-term maintenance of the Deep Creek West (DCW) Regional Stormwater Treatment Facility (RST) built and owned by the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD). Based on initial investigations and studies, potential additional cost-effective nutrient-removal opportunities exist at the Deep Creek RST. As part of the Preliminary Engineering Report, Jones Edmunds worked with SJRWMD to verify current DCW nutrient-removal performance and identify system modifications that could increase nutrient-removal performance. During the initial phase of the project, a 30% design was prepared for the intake, forebay, wet detention pond (two alternatives), pond outfall, and wetland bypass. All of these elements were taken to final design. The design recommendations included: Forebay
  • Expand the opening to allow canals to become part of the pump station working volume.
  • Reconfigure the screen between forebay and wet well.
Pump station
  • Add backflow preventers on the existing pumps.
  • Add pump(s) with lower flow rates than the existing pumps.
Pond
  • Raise the existing berm to increase volume.
  • Expand the pond footprint.
  • Expand the pond footprint and raise the berm.
  • Adjust the pond outfall structure.
Wetland
  • Raise the perimeter berm elevation.
  • Partially regrade the wetland to reduce short-circuiting.
The second phase of this project was to prepare final design modifications to the DCW RST. Jones Edmunds worked collaboratively with the County and the SJRWMD to develop site investigations, construction drawings and specifications, and opinion of construction cost. Jones Edmunds also assisted the County procure $500,000 in grant monies from SJRWMD.

Citrus County SWRWRF Construction Services

Jones Edmunds provided services during construction for the construction of the new water reclamation facility in southwest Citrus County. The new facility includes an advanced wastewater treatment plant meeting a 5-5-3 effluent quality to replace the existing WWTF. The new 1.5-MGD AADF 4-stage BNR oxidation ditch system includes secondary clarifiers, disc filters, and chlorine disinfection. The effluent from this facility is currently going to high-rate rapid infiltration basins; however, we are currently designing the infrastructure—high service pump stations, ground storage tank, and pipeline—to provide reclaimed water to an existing 18-hole golf course. The facility construction project included full time resident observation, contract administration services and funding agency documentation support. The project was funded by SWFWMD (including Springs Funding) and an FDEP SRF loan. Read more about the design of this project.

Brevard County Central Disposal Facility Gas System Expansion & Modification

Jones Edmunds completed the design to modernize and expand the gas collection an...

Brevard County Central Disposal Facility Gas System Expansion & Modification

Jones Edmunds completed the design to modernize and expand the gas collection and control system (GCCS) at the Brevard County Central Disposal Facility. The GCCS required substantial upgrades to meet Title V requirements and to provide the estimated 3,000 scfm needed to supply the new 9.6-MW electrical power plant. The work consisted of evaluating the 140-acre system to determine the condition and areas requiring improvement. The GCCS analysis included reviewing wellfield data, gas quality, wellfield vacuum distribution, condensate management, and integration with filling operations. The new system included 2,200 linear feet of vertical wells, 11,000 linear feet of horizontal wells, and over 10,000 linear feet of HDPE pipe 16 inches and larger in diameter. Jones Edmunds also provided contract administration and construction services for the expansion and partial closure. A unique challenge was the need to keep the GCCS, which supplied approximately 2,000 scfm to the power plant, operating. Specifically, this required careful coordination with the County, the Contractor, the power plant, and Jones Edmunds field personnel.

Kennedy Space Center Central Campus Design NASA

The new seven-story, 200,000-SF Headquarters is a gateway building and Central Campus hub for NASA’s employees at the Kennedy Space Center. This project was led by HuntonBrady as the prime consultant to NASA, with Jones Edmunds as subconsultant throughout all design and construction phases. Jones Edmunds provided site stormwater management system design and permitting, including modifications to the KSC Region 1 Stormwater Permit, utility infrastructure design including water, sanitary sewer, and stormwater utilities and paving and grading of new roadway connections and parking facilities. We provided NASA with follow-on construction administration services for Phase 1 of the new Headquarters building, Kennedy Data Center facility, and associated off-site infrastructure improvements. Jones Edmunds is also providing design services for Phase 2 of the project and has designed a new signalized intersection currently in construction at the main entrance to the Headquarters building off of NASA Parkway.

This project is part of a planned campus theme designed to replace the current Headquarters building and several other support buildings within the Industrial Area. The campus theme was developed during a Master Planning effort in 2010 led by Jones Edmunds with HuntonBrady as the Chief Architect and Planner supporting NASA. The Master Planning effort developed multiple new campus scenarios, each involving transportation, infrastructure, and facilities planning elements, ultimately arriving at the selection of the concept used in the current design and construction phases.

NASA Space Commerce Way

This project consisted of designing approximately 2.5 miles of four-lane roadway...

NASA Space Commerce Way

This project consisted of designing approximately 2.5 miles of four-lane roadway with associated signalization and stormwater management. Space Commerce Way is west of Kennedy Parkway and connects Kennedy Parkway south of Ransom Road to NASA Parkway just west of the Visitor Center. The roadway provides access for non-badged persons traveling from North Merritt Island to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center as well as to Titusville. Jones Edmunds also designed, permitted, and provided construction services for a freshwater marsh created from an abandoned citrus grove that provided low wildlife and ecological value. Design of the freshwater marsh included elevations for three wetland communities, slope design, a vegetation planting plan, a remedial plan, and a monitoring plan. Several design elements were added to increase wildlife habitat, including deep and shallow zones, upland islands, hydrologic connections to adjacent water bodies, and snags for bird roosting. The wetland has undergone 3 years of post-construction monitoring. These monitoring events have demonstrated that wildlife use is high as evidenced by continual observations of fish, alligators, turtles, and various wading birds. Jones Edmunds also provided technical services during the construction of Space Commerce Way. The work included associated wetland mitigation construction and bidding services. Mitigation design included supervising, implementing, and monitoring a 2-acre created freshwater marsh and creation of a 56-acre saltwater marsh at the Kennedy Space Center to compensate for wetland impacts associated with the construction of the roadway. A critical design element was to develop a created wetland area that would not become dominated by Brazilian pepper. Jones Edmunds developed design criteria for the mitigation site by documenting vegetation, soils, and hydrology in an adjacent wetland, as well as wetlands dominated by Brazilian pepper. In addition, we helped NASA restore a 56-acre saltwater marsh that had been degraded from a mosquito impoundment.

City of St. Cloud Southside Wastewater Treatment Facility Expansion

Jones Edmunds provided professional engineering services for the preliminary des...

City of St. Cloud Southside Wastewater Treatment Facility Expansion

Jones Edmunds provided professional engineering services for the preliminary design report (PDR), final design, permitting, construction administration, and start-up of a new 6-MGD Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) wastewater treatment facility to produce reclaimed water for unrestricted public access reuse for the City of St. Cloud. This project was a follow-up to a wastewater master plan conducted by Jones Edmunds to assess the City’s wastewater needs for the next 20 years. The PDR phase evaluated alternative unit treatment processes for headworks screening and grit removal; alternative biological treatment processes, including membrane bioreactor, oxidation ditch, and MLE; and alternative aeration systems including fine bubble and jet aeration. We conducted workshops with City engineering and operations staff to select the final unit process configurations and equipment. The recommended facility design includes headworks screening using mechanical step screens with screenings dewatering; vortex grit removal and classification; odor control using bioadsorption within aeration-tank-mixed liquor, anoxic/aeration basins, centrifugal blowers, and fine-bubble aeration; three 105-ft-diameter final clarifiers; effluent filtration with disk filters; chlorine disinfection with sodium hypochlorite; and a high-service reclaimed water pump station designed for a peak rate of 20 MGD. The plant design makes it easily expandable to 9 MGD.The plant included a new administration building and reuse of the old Southside WWTF tankage, which was converted into aerobic digesters for storing and stabilizing waste-activated biosolids before dewatering by a new screw-press dewatering system. Jones Edmunds prepared 95% design drawings and specifications and CM-at-Risk RFP documents for selecting a CM-at-Risk contractor. We conducted value engineering with the CM at Risk to reduce the overall Guaranteed Maximum Price for the project. The project received funding under the SRF loan program. Construction of the screw-press dewatering facilities finished in September 2005. Furthermore, construction of the 20-MG reclaimed water pump station finished in September 2006 to meet FDEP requirements and/or receive grant funding from SFWMD grant funding. The 6-MGD expansion began operation in 2008.The City of St. Cloud facility was featured and toured as part of the annual WEFTEC conference held in Orlando in 2009.

City of Plant City Sydney Road Reclaimed Water Main

Jones Edmunds designed and obtained permitting for a reclaimed water main and bo...

City of Plant City Sydney Road Reclaimed Water Main

Jones Edmunds designed and obtained permitting for a reclaimed water main and booster pump station to connect the City’s WRF to two private reclaimed water customers along the route and three service points to the Walden Lakes Community golf course. The reclaimed water main installation includes:
  • A booster pump station
  • Two pond discharge stations
  • Two pond-level monitoring stations
  • Approximately 23,000 feet of 24-inch PVC transmission main
  • 6-inch, 8-inch, and 12-inch PVC distribution mains
The reclaimed water main design includes:
  • Two FDOT roadway crossings
  • Two CSX track crossings
  • Work in several City streets
The design for the pipeline includes several construction methods including:
  • Jack and bore under the two CSX tracks
  • Jack and bore under two highway crossings and one culvert
  • Open cut and HDD in the other areas of the project
Permitting issues had significant impact on the overall project. Wetlands along the route required an ERP permit from SWFWMD and an EPC permit from Hillsborough County. City personnel are performing the construction and therefore preparation of formal contract bid documents was not required. However, Jones Edmunds provided sewer plans and technical specifications. The work is partially funded by grants from SWFWMD and FDEP.

City of Gainesville Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration

Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park in Alachua County, Florida, became Florida’s first State Preserve in 1971 and is widely known as a world-class wetland. The Prairie has been designated an Outstanding Florida Water as well as a Florida Natural and Historical Landmark. Stormwater runoff and pollution from the City of Gainesville (Paynes Prairie’s closest neighbor) flowing downhill in Sweetwater Branch onto the Prairie Basin had a marked effect on the water quality, water quantity, and aquatic plant communities of the Prairie’s wetlands and lakes. Alachua Sink, a natural lake within Paynes Prairie, was identified as an impaired water body and FDEP established a regulatory TMDL that required nitrogen discharging to this lake to be reduced from all sources. The Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration Project presented a unique opportunity to rectify these problems while providing additional wildlife habitat, wildlife viewing, and public recreation opportunities.

Jones Edmunds was selected to provide design, permitting, and construction administration; wetland assessments and mapping; wetland jurisdictional line determination; mitigation plan and design; site evaluation; Phase I, II, and III EA; environmental sample collection and analyses; and contamination assessment. Two primary goals were addressed by the Sheetflow Restoration Project. Goal Number 1 was to satisfy the nitrogen-load reductions from the Main Street Water Reclamation Facility and urban stormwater to Sweetwater Branch as part of the TMDL requirements for the Alachua Sink. Goal Number 2 was to restore the rehydration mechanisms of Paynes Prairie to their natural condition.

The design entailed developing detailed site grading plans for a project footprint of over 250 acres and more than 1 million cubic yards of combined excavation and embankment. Jones Edmunds achieved a balanced site; earthwork cut and fill needs were equaled, so no fill material had to be imported or exported. Jones Edmunds also coordinated the architectural designs and electrical and mechanical system designs associated with the three on-site buildings, and the project included low-impact development stormwater controls. Extensive hydrologic and hydraulic modeling was performed to develop tools for the design and operation of stormwater conveyance, wetland treatment system, and sheetflow restoration.

Today, the public has direct access to enjoy the restored Prairie’s natural beauty and wildlife by visiting Sweetwater Wetlands Park. Shaped like the head of an alligator, the park consists of more than 125 acres of wetlands and ponds and is now a thriving habitat filled with plants and animals, including birds, butterflies, alligators, wild Florida cracker horses, and buffalo. There are 3.5 miles of walking trails, boardwalks, and elevated berms integrated throughout the stormwater treatment mechanisms. Other public amenities include a Visitors Center, a security residence and classroom facilities (all with associated utility services), educational signs and guided tours, and numerous shade pavilions and viewing towers.

City of Dunnellon Wastewater Collection System Improvements Phases I, IA, II, III, and IV

Jones Edmunds provided facilities planning, permitting, funding assistance, desi...

City of Dunnellon Wastewater Collection System Improvements Phases I, IA, II, III, and IV

Jones Edmunds provided facilities planning, permitting, funding assistance, design engineering, and construction-administration services to the City of Dunnellon for the City’s Wastewater System Improvements, which involved five phases planned to be completed over a 10-year period. Jones Edmunds provided professional engineering and administrative services to help the City develop and evaluate water and wastewater rates and impact fees to fund existing and projected water and sewer connections for areas served by the City’s water and wastewater systems. The wastewater rates and impact fees included expected new sewer connections for areas proposed to be served and described by the FDEP SRF-Disadvantaged Small Communities Grant Application. The water and wastewater rates and the impact fees included connections in areas expected to be served in addition to the SRF wastewater grant project areas. We developed the water and wastewater rates for the 5-year, 10-year, and 20-year revenue requirements for the 2001 through 2020 planning period. This study, called the City of Dunnellon, Water/Wastewater Rate and Impact Fees Study, was finalized and approved by the City Council in January 2002. Jones Edmunds was retained to develop a long-term Facility Plan for meeting the wastewater collection and treatment needs of the community. The Facility Plan evaluated the City’s existing wastewater collection and treatment facilities and provided recommendations for upgrading and expanding to meet the future needs of the City. The Facility Plan was submitted to and approved by FDEP. The project consisted of providing sewer collection and transmission upgrades to areas currently on septic and upgrading the wastewater collection system and wastewater treatment plant to handle and process additional wastewater flows and loads.

City of Gainesville NE SAFETEA-LU Roadway Improvements

Jones Edmunds worked with the City of Gainesville to improve the movement and sa...

City of Gainesville NE SAFETEA-LU Roadway Improvements

Jones Edmunds worked with the City of Gainesville to improve the movement and safety of traffic, pedestrians, and bicyclists in a neighborhood in Northeast Gainesville. We coordinated with City staff to conduct two public meetings to solicit comments and suggestions for improvements to five project corridors. We coordinated the meeting times and places and prepared materials for the meetings. These included mailers for the City to send out, presentation graphics, handouts, and comment cards. After the meetings, we reviewed and reported on the written and oral comments received to help the City limit the scope of projects. The projects required experience with local roadway design projects and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) procedural requirements, since state and federal highway funds provided substantial financing for this project. The work consisted of assessing project feasibility, analyzing alternatives, and conducting public and neighborhood meetings to determine resident sentiments. Finally, we helped with defining and scoping the projects, surveying, determining land rights and land rights needs, preparing preliminary and final engineering design, developing construction documents, and providing federal and state reporting and construction bid assistance.

St. Johns County Pavement Management Program

Jones Edmunds assisted St. Johns County in further developing its pavement management program (PMP). The County’s goals for this PMP were to build on the existing County pavement management components and to develop a program to improve the ability of County staff to routinely assess, prioritize, and track pavement management activities. The PMP will facilitate efficient allocation of County resources to maintain the County’s roadways and will be implemented and maintained by County staff. We developed an overall framework for the PMP; developed standard operating procedures (SOP) for typical analysis and reporting tasks using the County’s pavement management system; modeled maintenance and rehabilitation scenarios within MicroPAVER to develop a work plan for the annual County maintenance and rehabilitation activities; and coordinated and led workshops at the County to present the modeling results, work plan, and PMP.

Jones Edmunds also provided Construction Administration services for the County’s Pavement Management Program (PMP). For the PMP, the County uses its continuing services Contractors to perform drainage and roadway improvements throughout the County. Construction Administration duties included all phases of construction from planning, monitoring construction and schedule, cost estimating, and contractor pay requests.

NASA Space Launch Complex 2 Direct Propellant Landing

Jones Edmunds provided a design to replace the Hypergolic Propellant Loading Sys...

NASA Space Launch Complex 2 Direct Propellant Landing

Jones Edmunds provided a design to replace the Hypergolic Propellant Loading System with a direct tanker-to-launch-vehicle exchange at Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The project eliminated a propellant storage unit and the associated inefficient scrubbers from the system, reducing overall water usage and emissions.

City of Gainesville Hogtown and Possum Creek

Hogtown Creek and Possum Creek are located in a mix of residential and wooded ar...

City of Gainesville Hogtown and Possum Creek

Hogtown Creek and Possum Creek are located in a mix of residential and wooded areas in the City of Gainesville. They also accompany picturesque nature trails that are considered some of the top birding spots in the country. The City of Gainesville had a need to design drainage improvements for the Hogtown and Possum Creek crossings at NW 8th Avenue which would restore historical characteristics and functionality of the creek floodplain areas. Despite past cleaning efforts, the Hogtown Creek culvert was repeatedly filling with sediment to the point of almost complete flow blockage. This resulted in the diversion of flow through the floodplain to the Possum Creek culvert. The Possum Creek culvert has a spillway inlet that helps keep the culvert clear of sediment, but the spillway was undergoing structural failure as a result of the increased flows passing through it. Additionally, the NW 8th Avenue roadway altered the natural sheetflow patterns and caused changes to the hydroperiod of the wetland south of the roadway. Jones Edmunds provided modeling, design, and permitting services for their recommended drainage improvements. The project went from concept to permitting and construction completion within 12 months. The following objectives were achieved:
  • Minimized capital and maintenance costs associated with erosion and sediment accumulation in the Creeks.
  • Reduced flood risk to the roadway and homes in the area.
  • Minimized environmental impacts to the creeks and adjacent floodplain.
Our multi-component design system along NW 8th Avenue included:
  • Repairing the Possum Creek culvert and modifying the culvert inlet geometry to better promote self-flushing of sediment.
  • Armoring the streambed at the outlet of the Possum Creek culvert.
  • Creating a stabilized inlet and outlet at the Hogtown Creek culvert to facilitate sediment management.
  • Installing up to five cross-culverts across NW 8th Avenue to facilitate flow throughout the floodplain and wetland areas and to provide additional flow capacity under NW 8th Avenue.

Pinellas County 110-MGD Water Blending Facility

Jones Edmunds designed a phased approach to implement a water quality blending, ...

Pinellas County 110-MGD Water Blending Facility

Jones Edmunds designed a phased approach to implement a water quality blending, attenuation, and chemical treatment facility. After conversion to chloramine disinfection in 2002, this project resolved water quality problems in the Pinellas County Water System (PCWS). Pinellas County receives water from Tampa Bay Water from three sources-groundwater, surface water, and desalinized water. As a result, the varying blends of water from these sources cause widely fluctuating water quality changes within the PCWS. The WBF intends to attenuate these water quality changes. The facility has a design capacity of 110 MGD. The Basis of Design included a water quality study; blending studies; and other analyses for a proposed detention, blending, and minimal treatment facility. The report also included a review of project delivery options to identify the most cost-effective and efficient delivery method for this project. Furthermore, key project components included:
  • Two 10-MG mechanically mixed prestressed concrete blending/attenuation tanks
  • Chemical feed
  • Mixing facilities for six separate chemicals
  • A new high-service pumping station with two 10-MG mechanically mixed ground storage reservoirs
  • An Operations and Security building designed to withstand a Category 5 hurricane wind
To complete project tasks, Jones Edmunds prepared plans, specifications, and permits. We also performed hydraulic modeling as well as coordinating and providing support for public meetings. The facility is designed to accommodate membrane treatment facilities in the future, as required. The facility design was complete and ready for bidding for the spring of 2009.

Citrus County Southwest Regional Water Reclamation Facility

The Southwest Regional Water Reclamation Facility (SWRWRF) was an existing wastewater treatment facility that Citrus County owned and operated. It was located approximately 3 miles east of the Chassahowitzka River, which is an Outstanding Florida Water.

The Chassahowitzka River flows to the Gulf of Mexico and is formed from pristine waters contributed by more than 12 springs. Jones Edmunds completed the planning, permitting, and design phase of an advanced wastewater treatment plant meeting a 5-5-3 effluent quality to replace the existing WRF. Construction began in 2017 and was completed in 2019. A new 1.5-MGD AADF 4-stage BNR oxidation ditch system replaced the current facility. The new system has secondary clarifiers, disc filters, and chlorine disinfection capabilities. Reclaimed water disposes to rapid infiltration basins on the plant site and eventually to the County’s public access reuse system.

Our design addressed the following goals and objectives identified to upgrade the Southwest Regional WRF:

  • Replace aging wastewater treatment facilities with an advanced BNR treatment facilities with increased efficiency of operations
  • Meet Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and regulatory requirements that require advanced wastewater treatment to reduce nitrogen loadings to springs.
  • Expand the plant capacity to accommodate sewer service area population growth and de-commissioning of septic tanks within the springshed.
  • Reduce demand on groundwater used for irrigation in Citrus County by providing reclaimed water to public access reuse customers including existing golf courses and future residential irrigation systems.
  • Reduce demands on groundwater in the Chassahowitzka Springshed area, which was recently assigned a restrictive Minimum Flows and Levels (MFLs).

Jones Edmunds also prepared a Wastewater Facilities Plan in support of an SRF Construction Loan application. We provided additional support during the application process.

Read more about the Construction Administration services for this project.

Polk County Groundwater Recharge Investigation

Jones Edmunds conducted a Groundwater Recharge Investigation with Polk County Utilities in the County’s Northeast Regional Utilities Service Area (NERUSA). The project was cooperatively funded by the County and SWFWMD and examined the benefits of using reuse water to indirectly recharge the Floridan Aquifer via rapid infiltration basins (RIBs). Jones Edmunds conducted extensive desktop and field investigations and developed a subregional groundwater model to better evaluate the effects of recharging the Surficial Aquifer System (SAS) and Upper Florida Aquifer (UFA) and to quantify the additional groundwater that could be available as a result of beneficial recharge of the aquifer system. As a result of this project, the County should have an option for offsetting the potential impact of future groundwater withdrawals and be able to beneficially use 100% of its reclaimed water flows while providing opportunities for developing additional water supplies in an area where water supply options are limited. The first phase included the preliminary assessment of two sites that included compiling and reviewing available regional and local hydrologic and hydrogeologic information and developing a preliminary groundwater model. The suitability of two sites for aquifer recharge was also investigated. Building on the Preliminary Site Assessment, Jones Edmunds prepared a Detailed Field Investigation Plan that provided guidelines for testing objectives; proposed locations for additional monitoring wells and boring logs; and developed data collection plans, aquifer performance testing (APT) procedures, multi‐electrode electrical resistivity (MER) survey, and load‐testing procedures used in the Detailed Site Assessment.

City of Newberry Water Reclamation Facility Expansion

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services to the City of Newberry, including d...

City of Newberry Water Reclamation Facility Expansion

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services to the City of Newberry, including designing and permitting the expansion of the City’s Water Reclamation Facility from 0.349 MGD to 0.56 MGD. Our preliminary design services for this project included preparing the Facility’s Capacity Analysis Report Update followed by an Environmental Assessment and Wildlife Survey, a Facility Plan, and Preliminary Engineering Report. Design services included designing a new flow splitter, a 0.21-MGD ring-steel package plant, an effluent flow measurement station, a sodium hypochlorite feed and storage system, and a standby diesel generator. We also provided the design for expanding the effluent sprayfield. The City of Newbery considers this project Phase 1 of a planned two-phase expansion to take this facility to its ultimate capacity of 1.0 MGD by approximately 2017 to serve the growing population in the area.

Polk County Phase III Gas Collection System Operations

Jones Edmunds provided services required to operate and maintain Title V complia...

Polk County Phase III Gas Collection System Operations

Jones Edmunds provided services required to operate and maintain Title V compliance for Polk County’s Phase III Landfill Gas Collection and Control System (GCCS) in 2012-2013. Additionally, Jones Edmunds provided training services to familiarize County personnel with the GCCS and assisted with the transition to County operation of the GCCS in 2013. Jones Edmunds operated, maintained, and repaired the Phase III blower/ flare station and wellfield during weekly site visits. Activities including standard maintenance activities such as modifying gas collection wells; lubricating gas collection blowers; and trouble-shooting pump, flow meter, and failsafe valve malfunctions. Personnel were available by phone on a 24-hour basis to provide County personnel with technical assistance in restarting the blower flare station during unexpected system shut downs. Additionally, personnel were available on site within four hours to perform emergency system evaluations and repairs if necessary. In addition to the day-to-day operation of the GCCS, Jones Edmunds performed Title V monitoring and reporting to maintain compliance with the site’s Title V operations permit. Jones Edmunds balanced the wellfield weekly and performed wellfield monitoring and surface emissions monitoring monthly. Additionally, Jones Edmunds performed visible emissions monitoring of the flare stack. Jones Edmunds documented all aspects of their work at the site and prepared a majority of the Title V reports for the site. The reports included NSPS/NESHAP Semi-Annual Report, Title V Annual Operating Report (AOR) and Statement of Compliance, Annual Title V Emission Form and Fee Calculation, Visible Emissions Testing, and Surface Emissions Monitoring.

Marion County County-Wide Wastewater Feasibility Study

Jones Edmunds is providing professional engineering services to support the development of a Master Wastewater Feasibility Study associated with the Rainbow and Silver Springsheds BMAP. The study outlines planning-level strategies for addressing the impact of OSTDS and reducing the associated nutrient load over the next 20 years as defined in the Silver Springs and Upper Silver River and Rainbow Spring Group and Rainbow River BMAP. Service areas outside these BMAPs are being assessed as a part of the study based on a predetermined lot size density and as directed by Marion County Utilities (MCU). The work has included stakeholder meetings with other utility providers, special interest group meetings and five socially-distanced public meetings and an online meeting.  The online presence  includes a dedicated webpage on the Marion County website which provides a scripted video explaining the requirements of the Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act, the study process and the need for feedback from the public.  Surveys requesting citizen feedback were available at all meetings and online. This project was 100% funded through a FDEP initiative developed in 2018. Jones Edmunds personnel provided review and input to FDEP on the elements of the funding program.

Gainesville Regional Utilities Water and Wastewater/ArcFM Cityworks Implementation

Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) selected Jones Edmunds to conduct a needs/workflow assessment and develop an implementation plan. This implementation plan served as the roadmap to the roll-out of Azteca Cityworks and included database design, data migration, workflow re-engineering, software implementation, and training.

In addition to the existing GIS and work-order data, the GIS-centric database design had numerous considerations to be evaluated. Several independent legacy Oracle databases had to be reconciled and migrated into a common relational database. Subsequent to the enterprise deployment of Cityworks, GRU has gained considerable benefits, including but not limited to a significant reduction of the time associated with entry, analysis, and report generation of service requests and work orders. GRU now plans to make further use of the benefits gained by the Cityworks implementation.  Jones Edmunds worked with GRU to update the initial needs assessment and implementation plan.  GRU has been improving system monitoring, planning, and proactive maintenance by further using Cityworks, saving the utility and its customers money.

Jones Edmunds helped implement an ArcFM 8.2/CityWorks 4.0-based solution for updating and maintaining the GRU Water and Wastewater Facilities Mapping and Work-Order Management Systems, converting existing coverage and hardcopy data to a GeoDatabase.  The project used a single geodatabase to support facilities management software (ArcFM 8.2), work-order management software (Azteca Systems’ CityWorks 4.0), and future applications such as hydraulic modeling.

ArcGIS and ArcFM serve as the principal mapping and data management tools for GRU’s water and wastewater infrastructure.  Existing ArcInfo coverage and hardcopy data were converted to a geodatabase that is administered by ArcSDE within Oracle.  The GDB is available to users of ArcFM and Cityworks to support facility-mapping, work-order, and facility-maintenance functions. We developed custom procedures to enable GRU staff to incorporate as-built data into the GeoDatabase—a process currently contracted out.

Sarasota County Low-Impact Development Manual

Jones Edmunds developed a Low-Impact Development (LID) Manual for Sarasota County. This LID Manual was based partly on successful design ideas from similar manuals around the country and was tailored to the conditions encountered in Sarasota County. The LID Manual includes information on how to evaluate sites for LID practices, as well as details on four LID practices:
  • Detention with biofiltration
  • Pervious pavements
  • Stormwater reuse
  • Greenroof stormwater treatment systems
This project benefits the County in several ways:
  • It helps to streamline the permitting of stormwater projects by providing clearly documented standards and protocols
  • It helps the County save significantly, both in time and money invested on the stormwater management of roadway projects
  • It helps promote sustainable stormwater practices that are environmentally-conscious and sound
While developing the LID Manual, Jones Edmunds incorporated input from a large, involved working group that included various groups within Sarasota County (public and private), SWFWMD, and some nearby communities.

City of Bradenton Water Distribution System Model

Jones Edmunds created a steady-state hydraulic model of the City’s potable...

City of Bradenton Water Distribution System Model

Jones Edmunds created a steady-state hydraulic model of the City’s potable water distribution system which linked water demand billing records to nodes to develop accurate system demands. The system consists of ground storage tanks, high-service pumps, elevated storage tanks, and potable water transmission/distribution system piping. Once the model was completed, a field test collected water system data including system pressures, flows, and pump station performance to calibrate the model to +/- 4 psi. Uses for the model include sizing pipes needed for expansion, determining available fire flows to areas of the City, and performing a water quality analysis of the system.

St. Johns County Odor Control at Six Mile Master Pump Station

Jones Edmunds designed and provided construction-phase services for a two-stage,...

St. Johns County Odor Control at Six Mile Master Pump Station

Jones Edmunds designed and provided construction-phase services for a two-stage, biological absorption/adsorption odor control system for the Six Mile Master Pump Station. The system included an RFP vessel, nozzles, two independent stages of inorganic treatment media, moisture controls, nutrient supply system, air supply fan, interconnecting ducting, and all necessary accessories. The biological treatment stages used an inorganic expanded clay media to facilitate absorption and adsorption of odor compounds. The first stage operated with an independently controlled irrigation system to maintain optimum wetted conditions to support microbial growth for biological destruction of the odorous compounds and removal of toxic metabolites. The designed airflow rate capacity of the system is 1400 cfm. The County’s existing SCADA system was modified to incorporate the new facilities associated with the odor control system.

Volusia County DeLeon Springs Wastewater Feasibility Study

Under the 2016 Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) is required to adopt septic system remediation plans for OFSs where FDEP has determined that upgrading or eliminating septic systems is necessary to achieve nutrient water-quality objectives. DeLeon Spring is one of 31 Outstanding Florida Springs (OFSs) established in 2016 and one of three established in Volusia County. Jones Edmunds is preparing the Wastewater Treatment Feasibility Analysis Report (FAR), a grant-funded project intended to accelerate development of information essential to implementing an effective septic system remediation plan. Jones Edmunds personnel provided review and input to FDEP on the elements of the funding program. Key elements of the FAR are inventorying septic systems, assessing wastewater capacity and infrastructure, determining infrastructure upgrades, providing public outreach and education, and evaluating cost-effective projects and financing options. As part of the Public Outreach program, Jones Edmunds worked with the County and the DeLeon Springs Community Association, a local community partner, to hold a public meeting to share information about the requirements of the Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act and gain feedback and insights into the concerns of the public. We established education stations for initial discussion with meeting attendees and then walked through a presentation and held a question and answer session. Meeting attendees were asked to complete a survey in order to gather additional feedback on the perspective of area residents and businesses.

City of Melbourne Water Utility Geometric Network

Jones Edmunds created a water utility geometric network within an ESRI enterpris...

City of Melbourne Water Utility Geometric Network

Jones Edmunds created a water utility geometric network within an ESRI enterprise geodatabase for the City of Melbourne. This network serves as a single comprehensive database of the City’s water utility network that was assembled from the City’s various data sources. It includes scanned water utility maps, digital AutoCAD files, digital as-built drawings, GPS points, and other data sources. The database is a robust inventory of the water utility infrastructure that can integrate into the City’s asset management system. The database can also bring all of these information sets back in line with current real-world facilities and reconciling duplicate data. During the process, the City wanted to maintain the actual live and working/editing geodatabase on their network in ArcSDE. To accomplish this, we accessed their network remotely and performed our edits in a version of their water geodatabase.

NASA Traffic Study of Kennedy Space Center Roadways

Jones Edmunds conducted a traffic study at Kennedy Space Center to identify any ...

NASA Traffic Study of Kennedy Space Center Roadways

Jones Edmunds conducted a traffic study at Kennedy Space Center to identify any roadway and safety-related issues within the facility. We evaluated all major roadways, including over 42 miles of roadways, 60 intersections, and 1 highway-to-highway interchange. Jones Edmunds compared roadway design elements against the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials’ Greenbook and Roadside Design Guide. We also evaluated signage and striping against the Federal Highway Administration’s Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices. The study included obtaining traffic counts at all site entry points, determining the functional classification of each roadway, and establishing the applicable design speeds so we could apply proper design criteria. Study results included both graphical and narrative documentation of design deficiencies, site-specific recommendations to correct these deficiencies, a prioritized ranking of the deficiencies, and estimates of probable construction costs to implement the recommended corrections. Recommendations were classified as Immediate Priorities, Near-term Priorities, and Long-term Priorities.

NASA Vehicle Assembly Building Wind Resistance and Building Envelope Study

Jones Edmunds evaluated the conditions of and made recommendations for the repai...

NASA Vehicle Assembly Building Wind Resistance and Building Envelope Study

Jones Edmunds evaluated the conditions of and made recommendations for the repair of the building envelope, roofing and roof structure, translucent siding panels, and vertical high-bay doors to withstand various wind speeds. The study included wind-tunnel testing, in-situ panel testing, metallurgy, structural modeling, and laboratory testing.

Escambia County Perdido LF Section 4 GCCS Construction

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services to Escambia County for the final des...

Escambia County Perdido LF Section 4 GCCS Construction

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services to Escambia County for the final design, bidding, and construction-phase engineering services for extending the active landfill gas collection and control system into Cell 4 at the Perdido Landfill. We also assisted the County in the permitting process with FDEP for the landfill Title V Air Operation Permit. In 2010 the Escambia County Solid Waste Department upgraded its gas system at the Perdido Landfill in conjunction with a landfill gas-to-energy project. This effort included many concurrent construction projects such as the Landfill Gas Expansion Phase 1, Landfill Gas Header Relocation, and Landfill Gas Blower/Flare Station Construction. Jones Edmunds coordinated among numerous contractors, engineers, County staff, FDEP, and other officials associated with these projects. We provided construction scheduling and on-site engineering and resident observation support and coordinated project progress meetings. Jones Edmunds completed design, permitting, and construction of the Phase 2 gas system modifications at the Perdido Landfill, which included expanding the gas collection and control system (GCCS) into Section 4 and replacing under-performing components of the existing GCCS in other areas of the landfill. These modifications provide additional gas to the Gulf Power Landfill Gas-to-Energy Plant and to meet the landfill gas collection and control requirements of the FDEP Title V Air Operation Permit.

SJRWMD Crane Creek M-1 Canal Flow Restoration

Jones Edmunds is supporting the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) with preliminary design, final design, and permitting of flow restoration improvements associated with Crane Creek and M-1 Canal Flow Restoration Project. The project is based on the recommendations of the 2016 Indian River Lagoon (IRL) Stormwater Capture and Treatment Project Development and Feasibility Study, where Jones Edmunds was the lead consultant to the District and IRL Council. The project is intended to achieve water quality goals contributing to ecological restoration in the IRL while providing water supply benefits to the St. Johns River.

The project involves design and permitting of an operable control structure, base flow pumping station, conveyance systems including a crossing of I-95, and a stormwater treatment area (STA) that ultimately discharges to the St. Johns River. The project includes stakeholder and regulator meetings, field investigations, hydraulic and hydrologic (H&H) modeling, property acquisition support, funding support, preliminary engineering, final design, construction cost opinions, and related support to the District for readying the project for procurement and construction contracting.

Marion County SE 31st Street Retrofit

With construction of the SE 31st Street Retrofit, Marion County addressed a long...

Marion County SE 31st Street Retrofit

With construction of the SE 31st Street Retrofit, Marion County addressed a long-standing problem of untreated stormwater reaching the aquifer by draining into a large sinkhole. The formerly untreated stormwater drained from a 26-acre watershed just south of Ocala and flowed directly to the sinkhole via an upland cut ditch. This project attenuates peak flows and improves water quality before the stormwater discharges to the large sinkhole.Jones Edmunds assessed the site to determine vegetation community types and to determine if jurisdictional wetlands, surface waters, or listed wildlife species are present. The project site is in the Sensitive Karst Areas Basin and contains five sinkholes in the north portion. Results of the ground-penetrating radar evaluation found approximately 13 anomalies, indicating that a subsurface feature such as a sinkhole may be found at this location. A majority of these anomalies are close to the existing sinkholes. These data were used in the design process to avoid excavating in these areas.Jones Edmunds designed and permitted a lined 2.3-acre constructed wetland with a forebay and a small bioretention area that treated highway runoff before entering the wetland. Jones Edmunds also secured a permit from SJRWMD, prepared bid documents and specifications, and provided construction services. The wetland and the bioretention area were constructed in uplands throughout the central and east portion of the project site. The emergent marsh treats the remaining suspended solids and dissolved organics, nutrients, and metals and provides water attenuation and wildlife habitat. The bioretention area treats runoff from a 0.9-acre area of US 441 and its right-of-way and overflows to the forebay and wetland. Among its numerous benefits, this stormwater treatment system achieves the following:
  • Remove pollutants such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and heavy metals that typically occur in stormwater
  • Improve the water quality that discharges to the on-site sinkhole
  • Attenuate peak discharges
  • Maximize stormwater detention time within the constructed wetland
  • Create additional wildlife habitat

Citrus County Title V Compliance, GHG Verification, and GCCS Maintenance & Reporting

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services to the Citrus County Central Landfill to meet the landfill gas (LFG) monitoring and reporting requirements of the Solid Waste and Title V Operations Permit for Reporting Year 2017 (January 1 through December 31, 2017). The landfill operates under Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) permits: a Title V Operations Permit and a Solid Waste Operations Permit. The worked completed included:
  • LFG Wellfield Balancing and Maintenance –Field work performed by our subcontract firm Sullivan Environmental and reporting performed by Jones Edmunds.
  • Title V Compliance – Jones Edmunds performed all record-keeping and reporting to FED.
  • Greenhouse Gas Reporting – Jones Edmunds performed all record-keeping and reporting to EPA.
  • Greenhouse Gas Verification – Jones Edmunds performed all record-keeping, calculations, and reporting to Ruby Canyon and EPA.

City of Rockledge Reclaimed Water Ground Storage Tank

Jones Edmunds planned, designed, and helped obtain permitting for a 6-MG reclaim...

City of Rockledge Reclaimed Water Ground Storage Tank

Jones Edmunds planned, designed, and helped obtain permitting for a 6-MG reclaimed-water ground storage tank for the City of Rockledge. The planning phase included analyzing reclaimed water demand and supply; conducting a site evaluation to determine the placement of an additional ground storage tank; performing a hydraulic analysis of the reclaimed water pumping and storage system to determine how the new tank would be tied into the existing system; and analyzing piping, pumps, and mechanical equipment to determine if modifications would be necessary to accommodate the new tank.

City of Bradenton Aquifer Storage and Recovery Well

The Bill Evers Reservoir and associated surface water withdrawal has been successfully serving water to the City of Bradenton since 1948. Jones Edmunds has been working under a master contract with the City of Bradenton since 1948 (through our acquisition of Smith and Gillespie – current contract modified in 1971) and has been responsible for nearly every phase of its design since its inception. More recently, we designed the expansion of the reservoir and 8-MGD surface water treatment plant. Previously, we rerated the permitted capacity of the plant, increasing it 50% to 12 MGD. In part due to MFL constraints of the Braden River, alternatives to the existing supply of the reservoir needed to be evaluated. Part of the solution involves the completed design and future construction of an upland off-stream storage facility adjacent to the City’s water supply reservoir to capture excess flow from the Braden River during the wet season’s high flow periods. Additionally, and as a more cost-effective alternative to the reservoir expansion, we provided design and construction services for an ASR well. Analysis of the City’s current water supply capacity provided by the reservoir, augmentation well, and recently constructed potable water ASR well and projection of the City’s needs through 2025 show that an additional 2.6 MGD of raw water supply and storage will be needed to carry the City through projected drought periods. To help mitigate saltwater intrusion, the City has been working closely with the FDEP Underground Injection Control (UIC) group and the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) to permit and cooperatively fund a reclaimed AR well that will allow the recharge of excess reclaimed water during the wet season to the benefit the Southern Water Use Caution Area (SWUCA) Recovery Strategy and Most Impacted Area (MIA). SWFWMD’s goal is to recharge excess freshwater and raise the groundwater level to 13.1 feet to mitigate salt-water intrusion. The City, FDEP, and SWFWMD have worked together to develop an effective water management strategy to meet short- and long-term water needs of the community and the environment.

City of Largo Water Reclamation Facility Analysis & Recommended Upgrades

Jones Edmunds was part of a comprehensive team that evaluated the City of Largo&...

City of Largo Water Reclamation Facility Analysis & Recommended Upgrades

Jones Edmunds was part of a comprehensive team that evaluated the City of Largo’s sanitary sewer and wastewater treatment and disposal systems for capacity assessment and improvements. Jones Edmunds was responsible for the hydraulic and treatment capacity assessment of the City’s 18-MGD-AADF advanced biological nutrient removal wastewater reclamation facility (WRF). The project goals were to identify hydraulic improvements and treatment alternatives to reliably meet current and future hydraulic and biological treatment capacity needs for the current and expected future regulatory requirements. This evaluation was conducted through a combination of flow monitoring, physical survey, hydraulic assessment, and unit process assessment, including substantial efforts in biological system modeling and capacity assessments using customized and calibrated BioWin models. Jones Edmunds configured and calibrated the BioWin BNR modeling to simulate the performance of the existing biological nutrient removal processes and to evaluate several process configurations/modifications for biological nutrient removal improvements at future flows and loading conditions.In addition, Jones Edmunds implemented a full-scale clarifier stress testing program and computational fluid modeling to determine the ability of the secondary clarifiers to handle projected peak-hour flows and solids loadings. We configured a state-of-the-art clarifier computational fluid model (CFD) using the 2Dc CFD model developed by Dr. Alex McCorqudale at the University of New Orleans. Although the clarifiers did not meet 10 States Standards criteria for peak-flow conditions, field testing and modeling demonstrated that the clarifiers will handle the expected peak flows. Jones Edmunds evaluated the overall hydraulic performance of the chlorine contact basins at the plant by conducting a fluorometric dye study. This study determined the effective detention time achieved in the basin compared to theoretical detention time calculations and identified potential ways to optimize plug-flow dynamics.

City of Bradenton Wastewater Treatment Plant Expansion and Improvements

The City of Bradenton needed to expand and improve its existing plant and provid...

City of Bradenton Wastewater Treatment Plant Expansion and Improvements

The City of Bradenton needed to expand and improve its existing plant and provide reliable treatment capacity for continued residential and commercial development within the plant’s service area. Jones Edmunds provided design and construction-phase services to expand the plant to provide capacity for a build-out service population of 67,840 or approximately 9.0-MGD 3-month average daily flow (TMADF). Expanding and improving the WWTP included the following:
  • Modifying the inlet structure to include new influent flow metering, odor control, and grit washing and dewatering.
  • Replacing the four 75-horsepower aerators with new 125-horsepower aerators.
  • New clarifier flow splitter box.
  • New 100-foot-diameter secondary clarifier.
  • New return sludge pumping station.
  • New filter lift station pumping station.
  • Two additional 500-square-foot Tetra denitrification filter cells with a 6-foot media depth.
  • New effluent flow measurement system. Diffused aeration for Digester Nos. 1 and 2.
  • Designing an Operations Building annex to provide an additional office and records storage area.
  • Remodeling the interior of the existing Operations Building for additional laboratory space.
  • Installation of bio-filtration odor control system for WWTP headworks.
  • Renewing the Domestic Wastewater Facility Permit in 2003 and 2010.
The reclaimed water reuse system project included developing a reclaimed water reuse system master plan and updating a reuse feasibility study, evaluating and presenting the expansion program, preliminary engineering of expansion facilities, supporting the facility permit application, and providing the basis of a proposal for South West Florida Water Management District funding. Jones Edmunds prepared a plan to expand a reuse system that we had designed for the City. This proposed expansion involved constructing pumping facilities at the ground storage tank and a transmission line to the south and east to serve large agricultural areas (tomatoes, citrus, and nurseries). Jones Edmunds has also prepared SWFWMD grant applications for the project and helped the City negotiate the option agreement with El Paso Corporation for the Corporation’s proposed use of reclaimed water for cooling water.

City of Clearwater Headworks Evaluation, Design, and Construction-East, Northeast, and Marshall Street Water Reclamation Facilities

Jones Edmunds conducted a Headworks Evaluation and Design for the City’s t...

City of Clearwater Headworks Evaluation, Design, and Construction-East, Northeast, and Marshall Street Water Reclamation Facilities

Jones Edmunds conducted a Headworks Evaluation and Design for the City’s three water reclamation facilities (WRFs) – the East, Northeast, and Marshall Street WRFs. We also provided a scope for construction-administration-phase services for the Headworks Improvements. Services included evaluating system flows, assessing removal efficiencies of the grit system compared with the system’s basis of design, conducting onsite grit sampling and characterization, and evaluating new mechanical fine-screening and dewatering equipment. The recommended grit removal (vortex) and fine-screenings design upgrades (washing, dewatering, and compacting) for each WRF will increase capture efficiency of screenings and grit and reduce operations and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with repairing and cleaning basins. Electrical and control modifications were also performed on the new headworks systems.

Alachua County CEI Services

Jones Edmunds completed the construction contract administration and full-time resident observations for two construction projects (designed by others) that were bid together as one construction package for Alachua County Public Works. The projects were funded through FDOT and FEMA HMGP and were needed repairs due to damages from Hurricane Irma. The projects were:

  1. Slope stabilization along NW 16th Avenue where the Hogtown Creek was undercutting the road in the middle of Gainesville. The project used gabion baskets to stabilize the slope up to the road and gabion mattresses in the creek bottom to slow erosion and prevent undercutting of the stabilized slope. NW 16th Avenue is an FDOT road, so this project was funded paid by FDOT.
  2. Box culvert bridge replacement on NE 21st Street just north of Gainesville. The hurricane completely destroyed this box culvert so the replacement was funded by FEMA HMGP. This phase included upsizing the box culvert to allow for drastically increased flow through compared to the destroyed bridge.

In addition to providing the County with construction contract administration and resident observation, we also provided Davis-Bacon compliance services as are required in any funding agreement that uses federal monies. The Davis-Bacon compliance services included on-site wage interviews, compiling and verifying for accuracy the contractors wage statements submitted weekly, keeping an on-site project file for review by funding agencies, and leading funding agency review site visits.

Resident Observation services provided by our subsidiary firm JEAces as a subconsultant.

FDEP Fort Mose Exhibit Hall

Jones Edmunds provided site-civil engineering design and permitting services for...

FDEP Fort Mose Exhibit Hall

Jones Edmunds provided site-civil engineering design and permitting services for a new Exhibit Hall at Fort Mose in St. Augustine, Florida. Engineering services included site planning, wetland delineation, topographic surveying, roadways, parking, grading and stormwater management system design, site water and gravity sewer utility improvements, site electrical power and lighting, and associated permitting. In addition, permitting included FDEP water and wastewater construction permitting, St. Johns River Water Management District stormwater permitting, and site plan approval through the City of St. Augustine. The former fortress was established in 1738 and was the first free African American community in the United States.

St. Johns County Masters Tract Regional Stormwater Treatment Facility

St. Johns County implemented this project to reduce nutrient loads to the Lower ...

St. Johns County Masters Tract Regional Stormwater Treatment Facility

St. Johns County implemented this project to reduce nutrient loads to the Lower St. Johns River (LSJR) to meet the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) compliance goals of the LSJR Basin Management Action Plan. Jones Edmunds prepared a Preliminary Engineering Report (PER). We also helped with the design, permitting, and construction-phase services for the Masters Tract Regional Stormwater Treatment Facility. Masters Tract is a 272-acre parcel owned by St. Johns County adjacent to Deep Creek, a tributary of the LSJR. Agricultural uses negatively impact stormwater runoff from upstream areas, resulting in high nutrient loads to Deep Creek. As a result, the design focused on optimizing nitrogen removal through multiple treatment methodologies. These include wet pond construction, stormwater harvesting, infiltration canals, and constructed wetland communities. Jones Edmunds completed extensive wetland field investigations to delineate all on-site wetlands, identify wetland mitigation areas, and determine wetland creation design elevations using Deep Creek floodplain wetlands. We also provided a Phase I Environmental Assessment and soil nutrient for the County. The project included routing incoming creek flows to a stormwater pump station that discharges to a regional stormwater basin for initial treatment and nutrient removal. We then route the water to agricultural irrigation, two large emergent marsh flow-ways, or a series of three 13+-acre treatment wetland cells for further water-quality polishing. Furthermore, we use excess stormwater for irrigation of a nearby farm that currently uses groundwater. In addition, the project provides 21 wetland mitigation credits generated by the constructed wetlands to offset the future County Capital Improvement Program wetland impacts. These mitigation credits result in a value of approximately $2.1M. Jones Edmunds assisted the County in securing $2.9 million in grant funding and is providing grant administration and construction services.

Space Florida Shiloh Environmental Impact Statement

In this project that attracted national and international attention, Jones Edmunds provided project support for a broad range of resource areas including land use, water resources (wetlands, floodplains, surface waters, groundwater, and Wild and Scenic Rivers/Special Class water bodies), threatened and endangered species, infrastructure and utilities impacts, and transportation (highway access, roads, and railroads) impacts to natural resources. We also assisted with the required extensive public involvement and were involved with extensive agency coordination for the many possible alternatives to the proposed action.

Jones Edmunds coordinated with, prepared, and obtained approval from the USFWS Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge of a listed species survey plan for the launch complex and two proposed off-site support facilities in Volusia County. We subsequently completed USFWS/FWC-compliant Florida scrub-jay, eastern indigo snake, gopher tortoise, and four seasonal migratory bird surveys at the proposed at each location. We also set up four drift fence arrays to survey to investigate amphibian species such as the gopher frog and herpetofauna species at the Shiloh Launch Complex site. We completed jurisdictional wetland delineations for the USACE at the Shiloh Launch Complex, two off-site support facilities, and a notional Pad 49 at KSC and obtained jurisdictional determination permits. We provided information necessary to support Section 404(b) review and development of the USACE Least Environmentally Damaging Practicable Alternative and prepared a final report that was submitted to Space Florida.

NASA Firex I & II Water System Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided construction drawings and specifications for replacing FI...

NASA Firex I & II Water System Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided construction drawings and specifications for replacing FIREX pumps with diesel-driven fire pumps. Piping between the pump station and the launch pads was replaced with new 20-inch restrained joint ductile-iron pipe. The entire FIREX system from pump station to demand points at each launch pad was analyzed to determine worst-case operational hydraulic transient conditions.

Town of Melbourne Beach Stormwater Drainage Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided engineering, stormwater modeling, permitting, and constru...

Town of Melbourne Beach Stormwater Drainage Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided engineering, stormwater modeling, permitting, and construction-phase services for multiple stormwater drainage improvement projects for the Town of Melbourne Beach. The goal of the drainage improvement projects was to reduce flooding in the target basins. The improvement projects involved installing baffle boxes, bioretention systems, numerous swales, and flood improvement elements for the beachside community. The highlight of the project was the Sunset Boulevard Bioretention Park. The improvements consisted of regrading Sunset Boulevard to drain to the median, constructing approximately 1,080 LF of planted bioretention swales in the Sunset Boulevard median between Pine Street and Riverside Drive, constructing shallow grassed swales outside the drive lanes between Pine Street and Riverside Drive, and constructing six curb inlets and approximately 780 LF of new culvert. No overflow from the system was observed in October 2011 when a tropical system dropped more than 8 inches of rainfall.

Space Florida Exploration Park Wetlands Mitigation

This commercial aerospace project involved an extremely aggressive design build ...

Space Florida Exploration Park Wetlands Mitigation

This commercial aerospace project involved an extremely aggressive design build approach with very short timelines for planning, permitting, design, and construction. The project required close coordination with state and federal regulatory agencies to complete their permitting process including development of acceptable mitigation plans within a 4-month time frame. This project entails designing and permitting a wetland mitigation plan with St. Johns River Water Management District and United States Army Corps of Engineers to mitigate for wetland impacts due to launch facility construction.

City of High Springs Wastewater Collection System Design and Construction

Jones Edmunds prepared a preliminary design report and feasibility study for a n...

City of High Springs Wastewater Collection System Design and Construction

Jones Edmunds prepared a preliminary design report and feasibility study for a new wastewater collection, treatment, and disposal system for the City of High Springs. This system will eliminate the City’s reliance on failing septic tanks and private package-type wastewater treatment plants. The report included analyses of operating, maintenance, and debt service costs for the business service area and full-service area. Jones Edmunds evaluated numerous collection, treatment, and disposal options. We also evaluated funding alternatives for the City, such as U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development grants and loans, Community Development Block Grants, Suwannee River Water Management District Grants, corporate grants, and other state and local grant sources. The construction cost estimates were $3.6 million for the proposed business-area system and $10.9 million for the full-service area system. Construction of the system was projected to take 10 years, or 2 years per phase. We evaluated alternatives such as including a conventional gravity-collection system, a vacuum-collection system, a low-pressure-collection system, a nitrification/denitrification wastewater treatment system, sprayfield effluent disposal, and effluent reuse options. Jones Edmunds completed the final design and construction services of the wastewater collection system, treatment plant, and effluent disposal system. The new wastewater system consists of a low-pressure sewer system, a master transfer pump station with force main, a 0.240-MGD wastewater treatment plant, and a 0.240-MGD restricted public-access sprayfield. We are providing design and construction-engineering services for expanding the wastewater collection and disposal system. The expansion included the low-pressure collection system installed in 2005 and the restricted public-access sprayfield.

NASA 21st Century Horizontal Launch and Landing Area Development Plan

Jones Edmunds provided planning and engineering services to develop a horizontal...

NASA 21st Century Horizontal Launch and Landing Area Development Plan

Jones Edmunds provided planning and engineering services to develop a horizontal launch and landing area development plan for the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The study included recommendations for future spaceport infrastructure to re-purpose the facility into a commercial launch site and a 20-year capital improvement and growth forecast to transform the facility.

Pinellas County Keller Water Treatment Facility

For the last 60 years, the Keller Water Treatment plant has served Pinellas County. It was beginning to show its age, and the fear was a hurricane, or blackout or brownout could shut it down, which would deprive 900,000 Floridians of potable water. Jones Edmunds was selected to help with the transition to a newer system. Jones Edmunds provided planning, design, permitting, and construction phase services to construct a new high-service/transfer pumping station capable of distributing 55 million gallons of water a day and upgrade the chemical feed facility. The project included adding a new hydraulic surge-control station and emergency water supply bypass station, as well as a new control building rated for a Category V hurricane. The project also assisted in the County’s overall plan to mitigate the annual flushing water required to maintain water quality. Electrical capital costs were reduced with medium voltage pumps, switchgear, and an emergency generator. Overall, the project saved the county $1 million.

FDEP Rainbow Springs State Park Improvements

Jones Edmunds designed and provided construction-phase services for improvements...

FDEP Rainbow Springs State Park Improvements

Jones Edmunds designed and provided construction-phase services for improvements at Rainbow Springs State Park for the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). We also helped obtain an environmental resource permit through the Southwest Florida Water Management District. Project elements included:
  • Boardwalks
  • A gazebo
  • A man-made waterfall restoration
  • Steps leading into the spring head
The river boardwalk and the overlook which views the Rainbow Spring head provided for pedestrian foot traffic through an environmentally-sensitive area with a 20-ft overview of the spring. In addition, we constructed wooden steps to provide easier access to the area.

Brevard County South Landfill Expansion – Cell 1

Jones Edmunds provided engineering services to design and permit the first cell – approximately 40 acres – of a new 220-acre Class I landfill. Jones Edmunds performed a preliminary engineering study to offer cost-saving options that included evaluating releasing conservation easements, various liner system and leachate collection system configurations, and cell size and location options. We performed stormwater modeling and wetland mitigation analysis for the 220-acre final buildout and the existing slurry wall landfill to obtain an ERP. To maximize landfill capacity and reduce the amount of imported fill required, the new cell’s bottom liner will be constructed up to 10 feet below the groundwater table. We developed a dewatering plan and on-site groundwater recharge specifications and operations that will minimize impact to the adjacent Slurry Wall Landfill. Jones Edmunds also performed a value-engineering study of the design to identify areas that could reduce the capital cost. We helped the County obtain a permit modification based on the value-engineering changes and provided bid-level documents. The $20-million expansion is the first lined landfill for the County.

Hillsborough County Messler Road Drainage Improvements

Jones Edmunds designed drainage improvements to alleviate chronic flooding probl...

Hillsborough County Messler Road Drainage Improvements

Jones Edmunds designed drainage improvements to alleviate chronic flooding problems along Messler Road. The project included detailed hydraulic and hydrologic modeling, preparing design plans and specifications, obtaining permitting, and providing construction-administration services for the recommended solution.

St. Augustine Geodatabase Implementation

High-tech GIS is thriving in a city founded in 1565. The quaint historic city of St. Augustine, Florida is running today on geospatial information that enhances operations, improves decision making, and provides better public service. The city needed a technology enhancement by converting from a personal geodatabase for their GIS to one based on central enterprise. Jones Edmunds was selected to put together a plan and a strategy for implementation. To begin this information upgrade, we attended multiple on-site meetings with city personnel to discuss current work and data flows and our team delivered thorough recommendations to streamline a once cumbersome, inefficient process. After rolling out an upgrade to software, new servers, and training, St. Augustine was able to make well-informed decisions and better serve its residents as well as its many visitors.

Charlotte County Sewer Master Plan

Tucked into the southwest coast of Florida, the beauty of Charlotte Harbor has drawn countless people to its shores. A regional effort is underway to improve and protect this crucial natural resource which impacts ecosystems, fisheries, marine and wildlife habitats, beaches, coastal wetlands, our tourism industry, home values, and overall quality of life. As a part of this effort, Charlotte County developed the Blue Water Strategy to ensure and sustain the quality of natural water resources to protect and provide a safe water supply, a recreational haven and an environmental resource. The Blue Water Strategy consists of four key components: wastewater, reclaimed water, stormwater, and drinking water.

As a part of the Blue Water Strategy, the County enlisted Jones Edmunds to prepare the county-wide sewer master plan. Studies found that aging septic tanks drain into nearby waterways, contributing to water quality issues that can impact this resource. To improve the harbor’s water quality, Charlotte County plans to replace about 25,000 septic tanks with an affordable, reliable, and efficient wastewater collection and treatment system. We prioritized neighborhoods to convert the oldest septic systems near waterways first and developed a plan to help connect 14 neighborhoods to centralized wastewater system during the first 5-year phase to lower nitrogen loads. We were also tasked with identifying wastewater transmission and treatment facility improvements or expansions that would be needed to provide reliable service to the County’s growing population. The Geographic Information System-based models we developed provided data and cost-estimating tools for prioritizing the work.

NASA Kennedy Space Center Water and Wastewater Systems

Jones Edmunds evaluated approximately 65 miles of Kennedy Space Center’s w...

NASA Kennedy Space Center Water and Wastewater Systems

Jones Edmunds evaluated approximately 65 miles of Kennedy Space Center’s water distribution and wastewater collection/transmission system followed by a multi-year design and construction initiative to refurbish and replace much of this system. As part of the initiative to upgrade KSC’s aging water and wastewater infrastructure, the improvements reduced water age; maintained current fire-flow capabilities, water quality monitoring, and system operations; and upgraded system components that were at high risk of failure.

NASA Vehicle Assembly Building South Wetlands Stormwater Management

Jones Edmunds designed a regional stormwater management system that rehydrated a...

NASA Vehicle Assembly Building South Wetlands Stormwater Management

Jones Edmunds designed a regional stormwater management system that rehydrated a hydrologically degraded forested wetland for stormwater attenuation and treatment. This project offered an ideal opportunity for the compatible use of a natural degraded wetland to attenuate stormwater and to provide enhanced water quality treatment to an Outstanding Florida Waterway and resulted in significant cost savings.

City of Oldsmar Harbor Palms Infrastructure Improvements

The Harbor Palms residential neighborhood consists of 473 homes, and the infrastructure and utilities are estimated to be approximately 40 years old. The PVC water mains were privately constructed and maintained, but later the City took over maintenance responsibilities. The materials used to construct the utilities do not meet City utility design standards; the mains are inadequate in both size and material and are failing.

Many roadways and sidewalks are reaching the end of their useful lives, and some sections are exhibiting major distress from subsurface water damage. Also, the City wishes to evaluate extending reclaimed water services within the development and provide individual service connections to each home.

Jones Edmunds designed new water and reclaimed distribution piping with new individual service connections to replace the existing substandard piping. This included analyzing pressures and flows, upsizing mains to improve flows, upgrading water services within the rights-of-way, and analyzing and repositioning fire hydrants. The sanitary sewer clay pipes and storm sewer pipes were videoed and assessed to identify point repair locations. Sidewalks and roadways were assessed with the goal of abandoning the rear easement pipe and redirecting stormwater to the roadways.

The work included roadway plan production for the multiple roadway rehabilitation techniques. This included pavement evaluations, costing of rehabilitation alternatives, investigating high groundwater concerns, pavement design, and coordination with the client and their operations and maintenance staff. Sidewalks were rehabilitated and/or replaced and brought to ADA standards.

Citrus County Garcia Point Septic to Sewer Conversion

Jones Edmunds provided septic-to-sewer planning, sewer design and modeling, permitting, funding assistance, and public outreach and education on this project as well as services during construction. From a funding perspective, our team worked with the County to reallocate a 2006 Legislative appropriation originally directed to an area at the head waters of the Homosassa Spring and to procure “Springs” funding that resulted from the 2016 Florida Springs and Aquifer Protection Act and Cooperative Funding from the SWFWMD. Jones Edmunds worked with the County, FDEP, SWFWMD and the State Legislature to procure project funding. Jones Edmunds also provided the documentation associated with the grant requirements. The Jones Edmunds team also provided public outreach and education specifically targeted toward the residents of the Garcia Point community who would be impacted by the project. Two Open House meetings were held to explain the goals of the project and gain feedback from the residents on the concerns about the project. Ongoing communication support was provided during project construction to keep residents apprised of construction activities to allow them to plan accordingly.

City of Zephyrhills US 301 Interconnect and Booster Pump Station

Due to increasing growth, the City expects that its raw water production will reach capacity in the near future. As a result, the City entered into an agreement with the City of Dade City to purchase water to meet the City’s future potable water needs. This water will be delivered to the City through a water main and booster pump station installed on the west side of US 301 from Phelps Road to US 98. The elements of this project include the following:

  • Install approximately 16,000 linear feet of 12-inch PVC water main within FDOT right-of-way along the west side of US 301
  • Install approximately 1,300 feet of 12-inch PVC water main within the CITY right-of-way along Kossik Road.
  • Install horizontal directional drills at appropriate road and driveway crossings using high-density polyethylene pipe.
  • Install a factory-assembled package pump station that will include adjustable-speed pumping units installed on an exterior aluminum skid; pump suction and discharge steel piping complete with isolation, check, and air release valves; and a prefabricated electrical and controls building complete with controls, telemetry, power, lighting, and HVAC systems.

Jones Edmunds provided Construction Administration Services during the entire project which entailed coordination between both Municipalities and the FDOT, Review of Submittals, Part-time Resident Observation, Witnessing of Tests, Conducting Meetings, Administering Contract Change Orders, Training of City Operating Personnel, production of Final Record Drawings and Certification to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

NASA Siting Study for Central Campus Complex

Jones Edmunds provided master planning services for a Siting Study for a propose...

NASA Siting Study for Central Campus Complex

Jones Edmunds provided master planning services for a Siting Study for a proposed Central Campus Complex at Kennedy Space Center. The Central Campus Complex Study evaluated consolidating nine facilities in the KSC Industrial Area (totaling 675,000 SF) into new buildings to be constructed on the existing Headquarters site. The Study evaluated multiple construction and demolition phasing options.

Gainesville Regional Utilities Infiltration and Inflow (I&I) Reduction

Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) has historically invested significant resources to evaluate and reduce I&I sources but recognized the need for a more programmatic approach for prioritizing rehabilitation and replacement efforts. GRU provides wastewater service to approximately 200,000 people. The GRU wastewater collection system includes over 1,100 miles of piping, 15,500 manholes, 170 lift stations, and 65,000 customer connections.

Recognizing that GRU has excellent technical staff with great institutional knowledge of their system and many lessons learned about what works best for their system and staff, we developed the I&I Reduction Program in a highly collaborative process with them. A decision we made collectively at the beginning of the project was to use an early-out area to go through the tasks that GRU would perform on an annual basis after our team had developed the Program as a way to make refinements and fill data gaps prior to going into a full-scale production. By completing the field investigations, including flow monitoring, smoke testing, manhole inspections, and night-time flow isolation in the early-out area, the Program team was able to determine processes that can best be used moving forward in other parts of the system, with lessons learned being applied.

One of the next major elements of the project was converting lift stations runtimes to flow hydrographs for the most recent two years of data for approximately 170 lift stations. We then compared the hydrographs to NEXRAD rainfall and quantified dry- and wet-season groundwater infiltration, base wastewater flow, and rainfall-dependent I&I. This analysis allowed us to prioritize the lift station basins for field investigation based on where the biggest return would be for the rehabilitation effort at a cost that was significantly less that flow monitoring. Results were corroborated with 10 permanent meter locations, metered winter water use, and known problems at lift stations. We then used short-term flow monitoring in some of the larger basins to further identify specific locations that are most in need of rehabilitation for I&I flow reduction, using other data to also evaluate structural integrity and risk of failure. The Program is set up to have rolling priorities set 2-3 years in advance for field investigation – followed by targeted rehabilitation – so that each step can be properly planned and budgeted.

The Program team also developed level-of-service (LOS) criteria that consider the unique challenges that GRU faces, including being more influenced by groundwater infiltration than by rainfall-derived I&I. The LOS criteria are tied to key performance indicators (KPI), with assumptions, methods of measurement, frequency of measurement, regulatory and internal drivers, influencing factors, and potential solutions identified for each KPI. We also performed an economic analysis to determine at what point conveyance and treatment is more cost-effective than rehabilitation, understanding that the collection system degradation is an ongoing process. The economic analysis was also used to refine the LOS criteria to ensure that the criteria are affordable.

St. Johns County Wetland and TMDL Feasibility Study

Jones Edmunds is analyzing properties in the southwest part of St. Johns County ...

St. Johns County Wetland and TMDL Feasibility Study

Jones Edmunds is analyzing properties in the southwest part of St. Johns County with the goal of identifying parcels that are potential land acquisition opportunities. The feasibility study is identifying sites that serve multiple goals and are economically advantageous. The opportunities identified at each site are prioritized based on their potential role in mitigating water-quality issues related to the County’s Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Basin Management Action Plan (BMAP) for the Lower St. Johns River as well as the wetland mitigation opportunities. Many of the sites identified have the potential for restoring historical floodplain wetlands in existing sod farms or for creating wetlands. For instance, the Masters site which St. Johns County will purchase from SJRWMD, will help achieve the County’s BMAP nutrient-reduction goals, provide fill for other County capital projects, and serve as a regional offsite wetland mitigation area. This will be accomplished by restoring former Deep Creek floodplain wetlands, creating new wetlands, and enhancing uplands as well as designing, obtaining permitting for, and constructing a regional stormwater treatment facility that treats agricultural runoff before outfalling to Deep Creek (with a removed cost much lower than other alternatives).

Gainesville Regional Utilities Resident Observation Services

GRU’s wastewater infrastructure, like most systems of its age, has a considerable inflow and infiltration (I&I) problem. The older parts of GRU’s system consist mostly of clay and ductile iron pipe, and these older pipes have been identified as the main culprit with the infiltration problem. Jones Edmunds supported GRU to implement a program to rehabilitate the City’s older wastewater infrastructure. The project included initial video inspection of the antiquated pipes, cleaning the pipes through mechanical cutting or chemical injection, follow-up video inspection of the cleaned pipe and preparation for the lining procedure, lining the pipe using cured-in-place pipe lining technology, and final video inspection of the lined pipe and cutting the liner out at all connections to the newly lined pipe. The program has already helped to drastically decrease infiltration into the wastewater system. Initial flow measurements from a lift station – and comparing wastewater volumes from before the lining to volumes after the lining – show an almost 40-percent reduction in flow into the station. Due to these excellent initial results, GRU has expanded the program to include lining the lateral lines as well as implementing a manhole-lining program. Jones Edmunds provided construction administration and full-time construction QA oversight of the pipe rehabilitation program. We are also helping GRU by expanding their Cityworks program for our construction representatives to use in the field to issue work orders directly into their system when we observe issues from the video inspections. The Jones Edmunds team is able to provide all expert services – from our construction team leading the field work, to our wastewater engineers assisting with data evaluation, to our GIS technicians and programmers who are experts with asset management systems such as Cityworks – to help GRU implement an extremely effective program for reducing I&I into their wastewater system.

New River Solid Waste Association EGC Closure Design and Permitting

Jones Edmunds provided the New River Solid Waste Association (NRSWA) with engineering services to modify the closure design and permit the closure with an exposed geomembrane cover (EGC) for the New River Regional Landfill (NRRL). The design and permit modification modified the permitted traditional closure design. The project included preparing a substantial permit modification to address the changes to the side-slope closure for an EGC closure. We prepared and submitted a substantial permit-modification application in accordance with Rule 62-701, FAC, including preparing the required supporting calculations and documentation for constructing the EGC for the closure.

Jones Edmunds worked closely with the NRSWA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) to develop an Alternate Procedures Application for an Exposed Geomembrane Landfill Closure. Based on FDEP’s approval of the Alternate Procedures Application, Jones Edmunds submitted to FDEP a solid waste operation and construction permit application for an Exposed Geomembrane Cover (EGC) closure project. FDEP granted approval of the EGC application – this was first approved EGC closure permit in Florida. The conditions of the permit stated that an EGC would be installed as final cover until the material strength reached its half-life, at which time the traditional 24 inches of soil cover would be installed over the EGC.

The EGC is being constructed in phases as the landfill reaches final elevations. The EGC closure project includes preparing the final grade slopes, installing the geosynthetic material, and constructing the toe-drain system. The EGC closure project also included an evaluation of the gas collection and control system (GCCS) in the closure area. Phase I of the EGG project is approximately 15 acres. For Phase I, Jones Edmunds provided construction assistance including preparing bid and contract documents and coordinating Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) material testing and providing full-time CQA resident observation during construction.

NASA Demolition of Kennedy Space Center Old Headquarters Building and Central Instrumentation Facility

In alignment with NASA’s strategic goal to optimize capabilities and operations, KSC is in the process of divesting (demolishing) several obsolete and inefficient facilities. This project included the demolition of the old Headquarters Building (~440,000 SF) and Central Instrumentation Facility (~140,000 SF) and to reduce operational and maintenance costs at KSC. The project was also in support of the construction of the new Central Campus Complex.

The demolition task included supporting utility disconnections and alterations, hazardous material testing and coordination with NASA Environmental, and government support. The systems included water, wastewater, stormwater, gas, chill water, hot water, power, communications, and civil infrastructure. The design was coordinated with other improvements in the area to provide a seamless transition as NASA further develops the area into a Central Campus. During the construction phase, Jones Edmunds assisted NASA and provided industry expert support regarding PCB waste and disposal.

Jones Edmunds continues to provide engineering services during construction while the project shifts from the CIF demolition to the HQ Building demolition by reviewing shop drawings, responding to requests for information, attending construction progress meetings, making construction site visits, resolving unforeseen conditions, providing cost opinions, and will prepare as-built/record drawings.

Putnam County Landfill Mining

Jones Edmunds provided landfill mining construction-phase services for a closed unlined Class I Landfill cell located at the Putnam County Central Landfill. The services provided include conducting a waste investigation; creating construction-level documents; and providing bid-level and contract administration services, geotechnical analysis and design, solid waste permitting, and resident observation services. To save the County money, Jones Edmunds coordinated closely with the County during landfill mining, allowing the County to provide full-time resident observation in-house with Jones Edmunds providing limited support as needed.

City of St. Cloud 9-MGD MIEX Water Treatment Plant

Jones Edmunds planned, designed, permitted, and provided construction-phase services for a 9-MGD H. Clay Whaley Senior Memorial Water Plant and its associated well field. The WTP treats groundwater with magnetic ion exchange (MIEX¨) treatment technology. This method removes dissolved organic carbon in the raw water, followed by pH adjustment and deep-bubble aeration, resin-polishing filters, disinfection, fluoridation, and two 1-MG ground storage tanks before distribution. The overall system included H2S removal using a combination of ion exchange to remove bisulfide and deep-bubble aeration to remove remaining hydrogen sulfide. We used a unique magnetite media (magnetic) filter to capture resin fines from the MIEX process. The project also included design and permitting three new water supply wells (3 MGD each) and 4,000 feet of pipelines used to convey raw water from the groundwater wellfield through the treatment plant and 6,000 feet of 24-inch-diameter transmission main to supply the City’s potable water distribution system. This project also had the following benefits to the City:
  • Facility removes odor, color, and THM/HAA formation potential from Floridan Aquifer groundwater.
  • Treatment process reduced groundwater chlorine demand by 90%.
  • City’s public water supply system was brought into compliance with EPA Stage I & Stage II disinfection byproduct precursors (DBPs) rules.
  • Facility is energy-efficient by pumping only once to the facility using well pumps and gravity flow through the plant.
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