Featured Projects

Brevard County Lamplighter Area Drainage Study and Improvements

After Tropical Storm Fay flooded Lamplighter Village, Brevard County took immedi...

Brevard County Lamplighter Area Drainage Study and Improvements

After Tropical Storm Fay flooded Lamplighter Village, Brevard County took immediate action to lessen the chance of future flooding. Jones Edmunds conducted a study to determine ways to lower the flood stage in the Lamplighter area, part of the M-1 Canal/Crane Creek Watershed in unincorporated Brevard County. Crane Creek discharges to the Indian River Lagoon, but there are interconnections under I-95 to the St. Johns River. The study evaluated alternatives to divert more flow to the St. Johns River, which would also restore some historical flow patterns. Jones Edmunds then provided engineering services to the Brevard County Natural Resources Management Office as part of the County’s Watershed Management Program for culvert improvements under I-95 at Lamplighter Village in unincorporated Brevard County. The project involved fast-track design and permitting of approximately 200 linear feet of culvert (6-foot-by-6-foot box culvert equivalent) under I-95 to parallel an existing 6-foot-by-6-foot box culvert. The County plans to contract with the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and their contractor-who is currently working to widen I-95 in the area of the proposed culvert crossing-for construction. Our services on this project included designing the culvert improvement, preparing drawings and technical specifications, preparing an emergency request to the St. Johns River Water Management District to install the culvert before permitting, preparing a permit application package for FDOT, and providing technical assistance during the contracting and construction phases.

SWFWMD Flatford Swamp Feasibility Analysis

Flatford Swamp is a forested wetland in east Manatee County that has received ex...

SWFWMD Flatford Swamp Feasibility Analysis

Flatford Swamp is a forested wetland in east Manatee County that has received excess water during the dry season due to nearby agricultural practices. This has resulted in significant tree mortality and encroachment of several invasive herbaceous and shrub species. The goal of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of using recharge wells to restore the hydrologic period and at the same time use the water to recharge the Most Impacted Area (MIA) of the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA). Jones Edmunds, with ASRus as a subconsultant, completed a conceptual design of a surface water recharge project. The project evaluated the feasibility of using recharge wells to restore the hydrologic period and use the water to recharge the MIA of the UFA. The Jones Edmunds and ASRus team evaluated recharging potential flows of 30 MGD. As part of the project, the team obtained a construction and testing permit for an Exploratory Class V, Group 2 Exploratory Aquifer Recharge well through FDEP’s UIC Department. The proposed target recharge zone is the Avon Park High Permeability Zone, which is expected to be within the Underground Source of Drinking Water. The permit includes a Zone of Discharge condition to allow the injected water to equilibrate to concentrations below the drinking water standards before leaving the site.

City of Gainesville Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration

Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park in Alachua County, Florida, became Florida’...

City of Gainesville Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration

Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park in Alachua County, Florida, became Florida’s first State Preserve in 1971 and is widely known as a world-class wetland. The Prairie has been designated an Outstanding Florida Water as well as a Florida Natural and Historical Landmark. Stormwater runoff and pollution from the City of Gainesville (Paynes Prairie’s closest neighbor) flowing downhill in Sweetwater Branch onto the Prairie Basin had a marked effect on the water quality, water quantity, and aquatic plant communities of the Prairie’s wetlands and lakes. Alachua Sink, a natural lake within Paynes Prairie, was identified as an impaired water body and FDEP established a regulatory TMDL that required nitrogen discharging to this lake to be reduced from all sources. The Sweetwater Branch/Paynes Prairie Sheetflow Restoration Project presented a unique opportunity to rectify these problems while providing additional wildlife habitat, wildlife viewing, and public recreation opportunities.

Jones Edmunds was selected to provide design, permitting, and construction administration; wetland assessments and mapping; wetland jurisdictional line determination; mitigation plan and design; site evaluation; Phase I, II, and III EA; environmental sample collection and analyses; and contamination assessment. Two primary goals were addressed by the Sheetflow Restoration Project. Goal Number 1 was to satisfy the nitrogen-load reductions from the Main Street Water Reclamation Facility and urban stormwater to Sweetwater Branch as part of the TMDL requirements for the Alachua Sink. Goal Number 2 was to restore the rehydration mechanisms of Paynes Prairie to their natural condition.

The design entailed developing detailed site grading plans for a project footprint of over 250 acres and more than 1 million cubic yards of combined excavation and embankment. Jones Edmunds achieved a balanced site; earthwork cut and fill needs were equaled, so no fill material had to be imported or exported. Jones Edmunds also coordinated the architectural designs and electrical and mechanical system designs associated with the three on-site buildings, and the project included low-impact development stormwater controls. Extensive hydrologic and hydraulic modeling was performed to develop tools for the design and operation of stormwater conveyance, wetland treatment system, and sheetflow restoration.

Today, the public has direct access to enjoy the restored Prairie’s natural beauty and wildlife by visiting Sweetwater Wetlands Park. Shaped like the head of an alligator, the park consists of more than 125 acres of wetlands and ponds and is now a thriving habitat filled with plants and animals, including birds, butterflies, alligators, wild Florida cracker horses, and buffalo. There are 3.5 miles of walking trails, boardwalks, and elevated berms integrated throughout the stormwater treatment mechanisms. Other public amenities include a Visitors Center, a security residence and classroom facilities (all with associated utility services), educational signs and guided tours, and numerous shade pavilions and viewing towers.

According to the report on the first five years of operation that was required for permits to build the park, Sweetwater Wetlands Park is meeting its goal of restoring the water quality of the surrounding wetlands and natural flow into Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park. The system of ponds and vegetation is successfully trapping sediments and reducing nutrients from stormwater runoff and Gainesville Regional Utilities’ Main Street Water Reclamation Facility before it enters the Floridan aquifer. Read more on the project update in The Gainesville Sun.

SJRWMD Crane Creek M-1 Canal Flow Restoration

Jones Edmunds is supporting the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWM...

SJRWMD Crane Creek M-1 Canal Flow Restoration

Jones Edmunds is supporting the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) with preliminary design, final design, and permitting of flow restoration improvements associated with Crane Creek and M-1 Canal Flow Restoration Project. The project is based on the recommendations of the 2016 Indian River Lagoon (IRL) Stormwater Capture and Treatment Project Development and Feasibility Study, where Jones Edmunds was the lead consultant to the District and IRL Council. The project is intended to achieve water quality goals contributing to ecological restoration in the IRL while providing water supply benefits to the St. Johns River.

The project involves design and permitting of an operable control structure, base flow pumping station, conveyance systems including a crossing of I-95, and a stormwater treatment area (STA) that ultimately discharges to the St. Johns River. The project includes stakeholder and regulator meetings, field investigations, hydraulic and hydrologic (H&H) modeling, property acquisition support, funding support, preliminary engineering, final design, construction cost opinions, and related support to the District for readying the project for procurement and construction contracting.

Stormwater and Watershed Management

Stormwater is one of the most valuable resources in our communities. It plays an important role in supporting ecological health, recreational opportunities, aesthetics of our communities, and water supply. It also has the potential to cause flooding, create safety hazards, and damage our infrastructure. Jones Edmunds passion for understanding the roles that stormwater plays in both the natural and constructed environments and developing innovative ways to manage and protect this resource aligns with our clients’ desire to improve their communities and make them safer, more sustainable, and resilient places to live. We offer the following services:

  • Watershed/Stormwater Planning
  • Integrated Stormwater Design
  • Stormwater Treatment System Designs
  • Green Infrastructure/Low-Impact Development (GI/LID) Designs
  • Envision Certified Designs
  • Flood Forecasting and Emergency Preparedness
  • Community Rating System Support and Improvements
  • FEMA Updates
  • NPDES/TMDL/BMAP/Reasonable Assurance Plan Support
Jones Edmunds Logo
Skip to content