Featured Projects

City of Plant City Reclaimed Water Main Sanitary Sewage Force Main and Potable Water Main Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided the detailed design, prepared contract documents, obtaine...

City of Plant City Reclaimed Water Main Sanitary Sewage Force Main and Potable Water Main Improvements

Jones Edmunds provided the detailed design, prepared contract documents, obtained permitting, and provided limited construction-phase services for installing a Reclaimed Water Transmission Main (RCWM) and a Sanitary Sewage Force Main from the City’s wastewater treatment plant on Victoria Street to Cherry Street. The project involved preparing construction plans and specifications for two large-diameter parallel pipelines, along with roadway improvements, selected potable water main replacements, and future RCWM connection stub-outs. Specifically, the RCWM provided a source of reclaimed water from an existing RCW high-service pump station discharge pipe at the treatment plant to Wilder Road. Jones Edmunds’ services included:
  • 16,600 feet of 24-inch reclaimed water main
  • 12,600 feet of 20-inch sewage force main
  • 2,000 feet of 12-inch potable water main
  • FDOT permitting
  • Roadway reconstruction of over 4,000 feet of Cherry Street
  • CSX railroad permitting
  • Stakeholder communication and involvement
The job included furnishing and installing the new pipe, valves, fittings, connections, and crossings; excavating, backfilling, and compacting; testing; re-paving; and disposal and restoration in accordance with the project plans and City of Plant City specifications. The pipelines were installed along rights-of-way and in most locations required restoring the entire roadway to the original grade and dimensions. In some areas minor roadway and drainage flow improvements were accomplished as part of revised restoration activities. Jones Edmunds was also responsible for project permits, including a crossing of active CSX railroad lines and required permits, including SWFWMD, Hillsborough County Health Department, and FDEP. We also coordinated with and installed pipeline in conjunction with an ongoing FDOT roadway-widening project, requiring FDOT permitting. The route of the pipelines mainly traversed residential and commercial areas, which required close communication with the public. Pipeline tie-ins required close coordination with Hillsborough County Community College at one terminus and the City of Plant City’s wastewater treatment plant at the origin of the project.

Polk County Imperial Lakes WTP Improvements

The existing Imperial Lakes Water Treatment Plant (WTP) consists of two wells, a...

Polk County Imperial Lakes WTP Improvements

The existing Imperial Lakes Water Treatment Plant (WTP) consists of two wells, a 0.25-million-gallon (MG) pre-stressed concrete ground storage tank (GST), a high-service pumping station (HSPS), two hydropneumatic tanks, a sodium hypochlorite chemical storage and feed system, and a caustic chemical storage and feed system. Finished water is pumped from the WTP into the water distribution system through two 12-inch-diameter water mains. Based on data plate information, Well Pumps 1 and 2 have a combined capacity of 3,000 gallons per minute (gpm). The GST is fitted with a tray aerator for hydrogen sulfide removal. Unfortunately, hydrogen sulfide gas given off by aeration has deteriorated the concrete in the underside of the dome, causing exposure and subsequent corrosion of the rebar. A previous structural assessment of the GST concluded that the GST should be demolished. Based on data plate information, the HSPS consists of four pumps with unequal capacities. The firm capacity of the HSPS is 2,250 gpm. Jones Edmunds prepared the preliminary design report and final design improvements to the Imperial Lakes Water Treatment Plant. The final design improvements included:
  • Construct a third well and well pump.
  • Demolish the existing GST and construct a new 1-MG GST.
  • Construct a hydrogen sulfide removal system.
  • Expand the high-service pumping capability with a new high-service pump station.
  • Expand the sodium hypochlorite disinfection system.
  • Provide an emergency generator.

Pinellas County 110-MGD Water Blending Facility

Jones Edmunds designed a phased approach to implement a water quality blending, ...

Pinellas County 110-MGD Water Blending Facility

Jones Edmunds designed a phased approach to implement a water quality blending, attenuation, and chemical treatment facility. After conversion to chloramine disinfection in 2002, this project resolved water quality problems in the Pinellas County Water System (PCWS). Pinellas County receives water from Tampa Bay Water from three sources-groundwater, surface water, and desalinized water. As a result, the varying blends of water from these sources cause widely fluctuating water quality changes within the PCWS. The WBF intends to attenuate these water quality changes. The facility has a design capacity of 110 MGD. The Basis of Design included a water quality study; blending studies; and other analyses for a proposed detention, blending, and minimal treatment facility. The report also included a review of project delivery options to identify the most cost-effective and efficient delivery method for this project. Furthermore, key project components included:
  • Two 10-MG mechanically mixed prestressed concrete blending/attenuation tanks
  • Chemical feed
  • Mixing facilities for six separate chemicals
  • A new high-service pumping station with two 10-MG mechanically mixed ground storage reservoirs
  • An Operations and Security building designed to withstand a Category 5 hurricane wind
To complete project tasks, Jones Edmunds prepared plans, specifications, and permits. We also performed hydraulic modeling as well as coordinating and providing support for public meetings. The facility is designed to accommodate membrane treatment facilities in the future, as required. The facility design was complete and ready for bidding for the spring of 2009.

City of Bradenton Reservoir Expansion

Jones Edmunds designed the expansion of the City’s 1.4-billion-gallon rese...

City of Bradenton Reservoir Expansion

Jones Edmunds designed the expansion of the City’s 1.4-billion-gallon reservoir in the mid 1980s and an 8-MGD surface water treatment plant in the early 1990s. This project allowed the City to deliver stable finished water during seasonal variations in surface water supply quality. The surface-water treatment plant unit processes include:
  • Powered-activated carbon (PAC)
  • Chemical addition systems (pH adjustment with sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, ferric sulfate coagulation)
  • Rapid mixing
  • Flocculation
  • Settling
  • Filtration with dual-media filters,
  • Disinfection
  • 1 MG of clearwell capacity
  • A supplemental 14-inch potable groundwater well
  • An operations building,
  • An electrical instrumentation and control systems
  • A high-service pumping facilities with 4 MG of ground storag
In 2006, Jones Edmunds prepared a Water Treatment Plant Rerating Report and Permit Application to increase the permitted capacity of the City’s water treatment plant. As a result, the capacity increased from the existing 8.0-MGD to a proposed 12.0-MGD. The Rerating Report was prepared in accordance with the requirements contained in Chapter 62-555.528 FAC. The new operating permit for the increased 4 MGD of capacity was obtained with only minor modifications required to the facility. The estimated cost for the rerated plant capacity of 12 MGD was $600,000. Most of the upgrade work for new chemical feeders and storage tanks to be completed by the City public works staff. In 2009, Jones Edmunds designed a new disinfection tank for the plant’s water service to meet CT requirements at the increased plant capacity. Jones Edmunds completed the Phase 1 preliminary engineering report and then provided engineering services for the Phase 2 design of the Bradenton Reservoir Expansion. This project is being executed in accordance with a Southwest Florida Water Management District funding agreement. This project involves the design and construction of an upland off-stream storage facility adjacent to the City of Bradenton’s water supply reservoir. This facility will capture excess flow from the Braden River during the wet season’s high flow periods. Analysis of the City’s current water supply capacity provided by the existing reservoir, augmentation well, plus recently constructed potable water ASR well and projection of the City’s needs through 2025 show that an additional 2.15 MGD of raw water supply and storage to carry the City through drought periods will be needed. The estimated cost for the new storage facilities is $15,750,000.

Water

Potable water is the lifeblood of every community. We design water supply, treatment, pumping, and distribution systems with capacities of up to 100 million gallons per day (MGD). We excel at designing water distribution systems that alleviate large flow and pressure shifts. We use state-of-the-art computer modeling software during design phases to evaluate system performance. We offer the following water system services:

  • Master Planning
  • Water Supply, Treatment, and Distribution
  • Source Water Characterization
  • Water Transmission, Storage, and Pumping
  • Hydraulic Modeling
  • Water Quality
  • Pressure Pipeline Design and Piping Selection
Jones Edmunds Logo
Skip to content